Michael Adler Tim McCarthy is a local artist. EPP hired him to design and print T-shirts for us. Unfortunately, his wife experienced a medical catastrophe that isSee More still ongoing, they lost their house, and the printing machine is in storage. Tim is selling his original art works to raise money. He can often be found at the Downtown farmer's market. If anyone is interested or wants to help, I thought I'd post this. Here are some websites wit his work. http://www.natureart.biz/index.htmlSee Less24.07.2014 at 04:02 am
Michael Adler I might get a load of pine bark Tuesday afternoon, and maybe some coffee grounds too. We're out of both and need them to mix soil. Anyone want to help?22.07.2014 at 01:08 am
Brian MonkeySoul Stanton Joni Ellis could use some volunteers this Saturday 830 - 1130 am, to help me manage the volunteers from UF. Could you explain more on what and why weSee More will be moving garden beds to the school and working on the loquats at the front road? It would be nice to have a couple people help me give guidance as to what needs to be done. I thought that was going to be you until you decided to go to the mushroom workshop. I have 14 volunteers from UF, I could use some help.See Less16.07.2014 at 10:34 pm
Michael Adler what time?16.07.2014 at 11:44 pmJoni Ellis Oh yeah, 8:30 am to 11:30 am17.07.2014 at 07:35 amview 6 more commentsBrian MonkeySoul Stanton Maybe make an event?17.07.2014 at 10:02 amMichael Adler Do you have enough tools for everyone?17.07.2014 at 11:14 amMichael Adler How did it go?20.07.2014 at 03:27 amJoni Ellis It went well, we got lots pulled out of there and I paid John Colburn to spray garlon on the stumps. There is more to do, but we have a great start on this. We need to keep up the work out there and get it ready to plant in October.20.07.2014 at 08:06 amBrian MonkeySoul Stanton Any other volunteers show and how many students? Good job20.07.2014 at 11:02 amJoni Ellis We had 10 students and a woman named Lisa Mac from EPP. Will and my neighbor Paul manned the chainsaws and the students put it on the trailer and we dumped it down the road where they are taking trees out anyway.

We got a lot done. There is more to be done to finish up and get new trees in. But this made a great start, now we can actually get into the area.

John Colburn came and sprayed herbicide on the stumps and sprouting vegetation like cherry laurel and paper mulberry. So let's get some EPP volunteers down there soon to finish this up. We can put some trees in before the end of august. Give them a head start on growing before they go dormant for the winter.
~ J20.07.2014 at 12:54 pm
Michael Adler No Volunteer Day Sunday

Hi everyone.

We have lots to do, but we will probably not be doing any of it this Sunday, unless someone else wants to head
See More things up. I'm going to be at the mushroom workshop. I can show someone how to prepare air layers. We need to do that to the grapes and the Chickasaw plum. It's pretty easy, but time consuming.

Michael


P.S. Here is a report from last week:

Last Wednesday was our monthly plant sale. Chris Neilubowicz helped load the trailer. I managed to recruit a volunteer at the market to help pull the trailer in. I set up the booth. Aunt Maggie came and I could finally go move my car. Brian and Gabriela came toward the end and helped. They helped pack up and Gabriela helped me put the unsold plants back.

On Sunday, I was joined today by Zot and new volunteer Paul. We worked in the Siembra garden. I sprayed the callaloo while Zot pulled crabgrass. When paul arrived, he also worked on pulling crabgrass while I hauled loads of mulch, and he also spread mulch. Eventually I decided I'd hauled all the mulch I could that day, and Paul had pulled all the weeds he could, so we switched. Eventually everyone had done everything. Paul had to go and Zot helped me finish up putting things away and applying some fertilizer to some plants. Zot also brought figs to share, and we all took home lamb's quarters.See Less
15.07.2014 at 12:06 am
Faith Carr Love hearing (reading) the update! Give an idea of what a workday at EPP is. I think maybe you have some sit down work even I could do! July is full to the brim, August awaits!15.07.2014 at 07:44 amDeborah Aldridge Sounds like a lovely couple of days. Can't wait until it's cooler so I can join you.16.07.2014 at 06:09 pm
Christopher Quire
Attachment UnavailableThis attachment may have been removed or the person who shared it may not have permission to share it with you.
07.07.2014 at 12:37 pm
Michael Adler but they don't have that pest in their database!15.07.2014 at 12:06 am1
Michael Adler My calendar tells me people are coming on Saturday 7/19, to trim the trees by the loquats planted along the entrance road. It neglects to say who andSee More when and any contact information. Does anyone know anything about this?See Less08.07.2014 at 05:51 pm

Sugar Cane

Sugar Cane (Saccharum officinarum) is a perennial grass species with a sugary stem that can be chewed on, or refined into sugar. In North Florida, it has historically been used to make (cane) syrup.         

It enjoys moist soil that is high in organic matter, and if you can get it, clay. I have been advised to fertilize it with “tobacco” fertilizer with an N-P-K of 4-8-12.  If you just use lots of manure, you should be ok.  Make sure you have plenty of lime in the soil too.

In our area, sugar cane is historically harvested as the first frost of the year approaches. 

The leafy area on the top and the old leaves are stripped from the canes, and the canes are buried under piles of this refuse (called shucks) to keep them safe from the frost until they can be ground for juice, and the juice boiled into syrup.            

The roots will re-sprout the following spring. Apparently the crop is best the first or second or third years after planting, but yields decline after that, and by about seven years tops, the roots should be dug up, and the crop replanted. Propagating is easy.  Use whole canes or pieces that include at least a whole internode section (with a node at both ends), and plant them in trenches about six inches deep.
SugarCane
























More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search?sort=relevance&text=Saccharum%20officinarum

2 comments to Sugar Cane

  • Jeannie

    I just wanted to let you know that it is fantastic grilled, too. You shouldn’t swallow it, of course, but the flavor is worth the trouble! Cooked in oil, it tastes like any other delectable grilled vegetable, since what makes other grilled veggies so tasty is their caramelized sugars. Cooked in butter, the flavor leans more toward a toasted marshmallow. They make fantastic BBQ skewers!

  • thanks for the great tip jeannie!

Leave a Reply

Or

  

  

  

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>