Michael Adler I didn't send out one of these last week because I expected plenty of help at the nursery, as I do again this Sunday, but I like to keep you in the loop,See More for those of you who read these things.

Delta Nu Zeta is sending some members to us this Sunday. We will probably pull weeds, collect seeds, and maybe plant a thing or two.

Anyone else is still welcome to come, but I might have a hard time finding enough things for everyone to do. If anyone else would like to help coordinate volunteers, on the other hand, that might be useful.

Michael

P.S. Here is a report from the last couple weeks:

9/7/14: After my usual rounds checking on everything, Annette came to help. I don't remember everything we did, but there was some weed-pulling and we went to the garden and harvested lots of black callaloo by shaking it into a large bin. We also planted most of the yellow strawberry guava seeds we extracted the week before, into three large pots and covered them with screen. We only had three pieces of fiberglass screen, and nothing to cut the metal screen with, so we had some seeds left over.

9/10/14: Chris Neilubowicz helped load. Aunt Maggie and Joey helped set up the booth. I gave an interview to a group from FYCS working on a class project on nonprofits, and they planned to come volunteer at the nursery on Sundday. Some also helped with the sale. Brian helped at the booth a lot and also gave an interview. Gabriella stopped by for a bit too. Joey helped unload the plants at the nursery.

9/14/14: I started by mixing up some scythe organic herbicide and spraying lots of Chamaesyce weeds around the nursery. After that, the group from FYCS came. We went to the garden at Siembra to harvest callaloo seeds, but as soon as I was showing them how, we started getting rained on. We took shelter inside Siembra's seedling greenhouse and made friends with a fence lizard. When the rain stopped, we went back to the nursery and I started them on weeding and cutting free the pots that were growing into the ground. I pulled one away to help me plant the last yellow strawberry guava seeds and then we up-potted our last yellow strawberry guava plant. The group left. I up-potted two more strawberry guavas, cleaned and tested the greenhouse heater, investigated why the second row of the main plant area was looking very dry, and discovered a kink in the hose. I ran the sprinklers on them and planted 8 sugar canes.See Less
17.09.2014 at 11:36 pm
Bailey Abda Hey people,
I just moved here from Tampa and am looking to get more involved in the permie/herbal/gardening community.
Any suggestions/events, etc would
See More be greatly appreciated!See Less
16.09.2014 at 11:19 am
Michael Adler Hey, I just heard the Co-op is looking for a new home for the two fig trees growing in their planters. They were originally from us, but are much largerSee More now. They should be cut back when transplanted, unless it's early next spring, when they don't have any leaves. It will still take a lot of watering to get them settled.See Less
Attachment UnavailableThis attachment may have been removed or the person who shared it may not have permission to share it with you.
08.09.2014 at 09:48 pm
Michael Adler I think they were Texas blue giant and maybe a jelly.08.09.2014 at 09:49 pmAnnette Gilley Do they need to be moved right away? I would love to adopt at least one of them.08.09.2014 at 10:59 pmview 1 more commentsMichael Adler I don't know. Ask McTimberwolf08.09.2014 at 11:00 pm
Michael Adler Is anyone interested in leading a volunteer group one Saturday or week day evening? A pre-pharmacy organization has offered to help, but I'm not availableSee More most of those times.See Less08.09.2014 at 10:57 pm
Michael Adler Anyone interested in volunteering or interning with nextjenclimate.org to promote climate issues in the upcoming election please contact Trenton BrooksSee More brooks_trenton@yahoo.comSee Less04.09.2014 at 06:50 pm
Miranda Castro Great video!
If you have problems watching it in f/b it's on our website also here
http://edibleplantproject.org/videos/
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31.08.2014 at 03:38 pm
Sita Dial Can't watch it . Hmm ....02.09.2014 at 12:01 am
Maria Minno Please keep an eye out for this butterfly:
01.09.2014 at 11:31 pm

Sugar Cane

Sugar Cane (Saccharum officinarum) is a perennial grass species with a sugary stem that can be chewed on, or refined into sugar. In North Florida, it has historically been used to make (cane) syrup.         

It enjoys moist soil that is high in organic matter, and if you can get it, clay. I have been advised to fertilize it with “tobacco” fertilizer with an N-P-K of 4-8-12.  If you just use lots of manure, you should be ok.  Make sure you have plenty of lime in the soil too.

In our area, sugar cane is historically harvested as the first frost of the year approaches. 

The leafy area on the top and the old leaves are stripped from the canes, and the canes are buried under piles of this refuse (called shucks) to keep them safe from the frost until they can be ground for juice, and the juice boiled into syrup.            

The roots will re-sprout the following spring. Apparently the crop is best the first or second or third years after planting, but yields decline after that, and by about seven years tops, the roots should be dug up, and the crop replanted. Propagating is easy.  Use whole canes or pieces that include at least a whole internode section (with a node at both ends), and plant them in trenches about six inches deep.
SugarCane
























More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search?sort=relevance&text=Saccharum%20officinarum

2 comments to Sugar Cane

  • Jeannie

    I just wanted to let you know that it is fantastic grilled, too. You shouldn’t swallow it, of course, but the flavor is worth the trouble! Cooked in oil, it tastes like any other delectable grilled vegetable, since what makes other grilled veggies so tasty is their caramelized sugars. Cooked in butter, the flavor leans more toward a toasted marshmallow. They make fantastic BBQ skewers!

  • thanks for the great tip jeannie!

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