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Nancy Hendler Lots of progress being made at EPP today. During the week we even planted an Orchard.

Lots more work to be done and we would love to have you come join us. Let Crystal know when you are available to
See More come help. Thanks!See Less
24.05.2015 at 06:28 pmLike
Brian MonkeySoul Stanton 22.05.2015 at 01:35 pmLike
Brian MonkeySoul Stanton Fyi Michael Adler, Crystal Hartman. Chris Nielubowicz, Christopher Quire, Lyndall Brezina, Sarah Cervone22.05.2015 at 01:37 pm3Trey Proctor them look good. I'ma scoop some and make plum pudding!22.05.2015 at 04:37 pm1
Crystal Hartman Michael and I will be at the nursery tomorrow (Thursday) 4-6. If any of y'all want to come join us. The vision of a nursery is becoming a reality thanks to his guidance and help. Come check it out!21.05.2015 at 01:33 amLike
Crystal Hartman Sharing is fun! Share with your friends.
19.05.2015 at 01:12 pmLike
Crystal Hartman Crystal Hartman created an event for Edible Plant Project (.org).
19.05.2015 at 01:10 pmLike
Nancy Hendler Wish I could be there, already miss EPP.19.05.2015 at 03:11 pm1
Crystal Hartman I'm going to be at the nursery today from 3-6 if anyone wants to pop in. Just putzing around...18.05.2015 at 07:38 pmLike
Brandon Jones Are you going out there this weekend?19.05.2015 at 12:02 am1Crystal Hartman Yes Brandon, we will be there 9-1 Sunday. I will also be there 4-6 this Thursday.19.05.2015 at 12:54 am1view 2 more commentsBrandon Jones I am not a morning person and i have to wake 4:30am normally for work. Sunday is one of my days off, so i absolutely cherish sleeping in later. I think i can make it out by 11 Sunday though.19.05.2015 at 12:59 am1Michael Adler I almost did19.05.2015 at 03:03 am1

Sugar Cane

Sugar Cane (Saccharum officinarum) is a perennial grass species with a sugary stem that can be chewed on, or refined into sugar. In North Florida, it has historically been used to make (cane) syrup.         

It enjoys moist soil that is high in organic matter, and if you can get it, clay. I have been advised to fertilize it with “tobacco” fertilizer with an N-P-K of 4-8-12.  If you just use lots of manure, you should be ok.  Make sure you have plenty of lime in the soil too.

In our area, sugar cane is historically harvested as the first frost of the year approaches. 

The leafy area on the top and the old leaves are stripped from the canes, and the canes are buried under piles of this refuse (called shucks) to keep them safe from the frost until they can be ground for juice, and the juice boiled into syrup.            

The roots will re-sprout the following spring. Apparently the crop is best the first or second or third years after planting, but yields decline after that, and by about seven years tops, the roots should be dug up, and the crop replanted. Propagating is easy.  Use whole canes or pieces that include at least a whole internode section (with a node at both ends), and plant them in trenches about six inches deep.
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More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search?sort=relevance&text=Saccharum%20officinarum

2 comments to Sugar Cane

  • Jeannie

    I just wanted to let you know that it is fantastic grilled, too. You shouldn’t swallow it, of course, but the flavor is worth the trouble! Cooked in oil, it tastes like any other delectable grilled vegetable, since what makes other grilled veggies so tasty is their caramelized sugars. Cooked in butter, the flavor leans more toward a toasted marshmallow. They make fantastic BBQ skewers!

  • thanks for the great tip jeannie!

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