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Tad DeGroat shared March Against Monsanto's photo to the group: Edible Plant Project (.org). ... See MoreSee Less

Please boycott any plant treated with bee-killing neonicotinoids!

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Thank you very much to all the groups that came out to volunteer at the EPP Last Sun the 26th. There were so many I lost track of what groups came out. I know the Ladys Softball team came out and helped a lot. If you came out in a group let me know the title of the group and accolades will of appreciation will follow. Thank you all so much!!! ... See MoreSee Less

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Hey guys, Tristan from Coffee Culture here. I think there's been a misunderstanding with the grounds bins. To be clear, coffee culture should only ever have 2 bins at time. We fill about a bin a day, so if you guys came every other day to pick up and switch out, then we'd be in business. Otherwise, we're going to have to discontinue this agreement. We do not have the capacity inside to store all these bins, and it looks unsightly in the drive thru. Thank you for understanding! <3 ... See MoreSee Less

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This exciting event is coming up Sunday. We will be setting up the workshop at Joni Ellis patio. Also, if anyone is interested in volunteering or shopping at the monthly Sunday brunch workday there will be folks staying after the workshop to help out at the nursery as well. The speaker Katie Rogers is very excited and bringing a few folks with her that would love to help out also. You are welcome to bring drinks and refreshments. No charge for the workshop. If you'd like to make a donation, it will benefit sponsoring future events. ... See MoreSee Less

Plant Breeding for the Home Gardener and Sunday working brunch

March 26, 2017, 10:00am - March 26, 2017, 1:00pm

Are you tired of wimpy tomatoes and bland beans? Try making your own new varieties! The Edible Plant...

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Sugar Cane

Sugar Cane (Saccharum officinarum) is a perennial grass species with a sugary stem that can be chewed on, or refined into sugar. In North Florida, it has historically been used to make (cane) syrup.         

It enjoys moist soil that is high in organic matter, and if you can get it, clay. I have been advised to fertilize it with “tobacco” fertilizer with an N-P-K of 4-8-12.  If you just use lots of manure, you should be ok.  Make sure you have plenty of lime in the soil too.

In our area, sugar cane is historically harvested as the first frost of the year approaches. 

The leafy area on the top and the old leaves are stripped from the canes, and the canes are buried under piles of this refuse (called shucks) to keep them safe from the frost until they can be ground for juice, and the juice boiled into syrup.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The roots will re-sprout the following spring. Apparently the crop is best the first or second or third years after planting, but yields decline after that, and by about seven years tops, the roots should be dug up, and the crop replanted.

Propagating is easy.  Use whole canes or pieces that include at least a whole internode section (with a node at both ends), and plant them in trenches about six inches deep.
SugarCane

More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search?sort=relevance&text=Saccharum%20officinarum


2 comments to Sugar Cane

  • Jeannie

    I just wanted to let you know that it is fantastic grilled, too. You shouldn’t swallow it, of course, but the flavor is worth the trouble! Cooked in oil, it tastes like any other delectable grilled vegetable, since what makes other grilled veggies so tasty is their caramelized sugars. Cooked in butter, the flavor leans more toward a toasted marshmallow. They make fantastic BBQ skewers!

  • thanks for the great tip jeannie!

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