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Katie Thomas I'm interested in volunteering whenever yall need help. Please keep me posted :)26.07.2015 at 02:48 pmLike
Nancy Hendler Katie Thomas, we will be there this Thursday from 5 - 7 pm, please come join us.29.07.2015 at 09:26 amKatie Thomas Okay thanks!29.07.2015 at 01:05 pm
Annette Gilley Question - Does anyone know if we can grow plantains here in the G'ville area? I don't see them listed for sale at local nurseries or even from Just Fruits.15.07.2015 at 06:45 pmLike
Edulis Exsto The green native plant or the banana like fruit?22.07.2015 at 12:00 pmAnnette Gilley The banana like fruit, for cooking.26.07.2015 at 04:03 amview 2 more commentsAnnette Gilley anybody know? Michael Adler ?28.07.2015 at 05:27 amMichael Adler I wouldn't try. Bananas don't do very well here, don't fruit most years. Plantains are really big bananas and probably take longer to grow than others, so less likely to work.28.07.2015 at 02:10 pm1
Becky Leppard Will you all be having your farmers market sale next month In August? . I would like to send my daughter who lives in Gainesville over to buy some plants for me since I live in Orlando. Thanks27.07.2015 at 05:43 pmLike
Nancy Hendler Becky Leppard, Your daughter can also come to the Greenhouse to purchase plants. There we have a larger selection than what we bring to the Farmer's Market each month.28.07.2015 at 07:52 am
Jd Pierce I've had a lot of trouble fighting this on my kaffir lime tree for quite some time. Spraying it with neem seemed to set the lime tree itself back for a while but perhaps I used too much. It's actuallySee More growing despite this problem, how can I help it?See Less
25.07.2015 at 04:03 pmLike
Annette Gilley Serpentine Leaf Miner. Probably just wait for it to outgrow the damage.26.07.2015 at 04:01 am1
Aunt Maggi Can I use the picture of monarda punctata for the Herb Fest cover photo?24.07.2015 at 07:43 pmLike
Crystal Hartman Of course Aunt Maggi. Thanks for asking!24.07.2015 at 08:02 pmAunt Maggi thank you. :)25.07.2015 at 05:55 pm

Sugar Cane

Sugar Cane (Saccharum officinarum) is a perennial grass species with a sugary stem that can be chewed on, or refined into sugar. In North Florida, it has historically been used to make (cane) syrup.         

It enjoys moist soil that is high in organic matter, and if you can get it, clay. I have been advised to fertilize it with “tobacco” fertilizer with an N-P-K of 4-8-12.  If you just use lots of manure, you should be ok.  Make sure you have plenty of lime in the soil too.

In our area, sugar cane is historically harvested as the first frost of the year approaches. 

The leafy area on the top and the old leaves are stripped from the canes, and the canes are buried under piles of this refuse (called shucks) to keep them safe from the frost until they can be ground for juice, and the juice boiled into syrup.            

The roots will re-sprout the following spring. Apparently the crop is best the first or second or third years after planting, but yields decline after that, and by about seven years tops, the roots should be dug up, and the crop replanted. Propagating is easy.  Use whole canes or pieces that include at least a whole internode section (with a node at both ends), and plant them in trenches about six inches deep.
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More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search?sort=relevance&text=Saccharum%20officinarum

2 comments to Sugar Cane

  • Jeannie

    I just wanted to let you know that it is fantastic grilled, too. You shouldn’t swallow it, of course, but the flavor is worth the trouble! Cooked in oil, it tastes like any other delectable grilled vegetable, since what makes other grilled veggies so tasty is their caramelized sugars. Cooked in butter, the flavor leans more toward a toasted marshmallow. They make fantastic BBQ skewers!

  • thanks for the great tip jeannie!

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