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Gabriela Waschewsky You may remember the water kefirs I shared at the last EPP parties. I have lots of extra water kefir grains if you are interested in starting to make water kefir for yourself and others. PM me, don't replySee More to this post here. Thanks!See Less30.01.2015 at 12:05 pmLike
Crystal Hartman Family Volunteer Afternoon is TODAY (Jan. 29) from 4-6 pm.
All are welcome.
http://edibleplantproject.org/nursery/directions/
29.01.2015 at 02:36 pmLike
Crystal Hartman
28.01.2015 at 04:39 pmLike
Crystal Hartman Shout out for volunteer coordinator(s) for this Sunday (Jan 31, 12-4) and future Sundays.

I am usually unable to host the Sunday volunteer days and EPP is in need of a few volunteer coordinators who can
See More run the show. We want to keep the Sunday thing going, so please contact me if you are available regularly once or twice a month. Norm has graciously agreed to do the second Sunday of each month.
352-214-8179

We are grateful for any time you can give.See Less
28.01.2015 at 03:40 amLike
Crystal Hartman Oh, Lyndall has also offered to do a Sunday or two a month, and she just did one a couple weeks ago. Thanks Lyndall!28.01.2015 at 03:54 amGabriela Waschewsky This Sunday is Feb 1. I'm already committed to teach that day, but AE (after EarthSkills) I can take the first Sunday of each month.28.01.2015 at 10:29 am1view 5 more commentsBrian MonkeySoul Stanton The only reason why we did Sundays is because Michael Adlers religion.... many people have expressed preferences for Saturdays, especially because family and their religious purposes and students getting ready for school. I cant be around for at least another month.28.01.2015 at 01:58 pmCrystal Hartman Thank you Gabriela! I have you down for the first one of the month starting in march. Brian, I will consider switching it to Saturday. Let me confer with those concerned first. Thank you for the suggestion. I however, am usually in Perry each weekend.28.01.2015 at 02:01 pm1Brian MonkeySoul Stanton It would be cool to partner with OSAC, as they have work parties on Fridays at the student gardens. It would be nice to have satellite workshops to expand outreach and accessibility in town to available folks. Also the bus doesnt run Sundays, which has been a constant expressed barrier. Thanks Norm, Crystall, Lyndall, and Gabriela Waschewsky!28.01.2015 at 02:07 pm1Crystal Hartman Brian, OSAC is coming to EPP Sunday Feb 8 for our Project Propagation! Woot woot!28.01.2015 at 02:09 pm2Brian MonkeySoul Stanton Ya, we have kept a good relationship w them, especially the past officers. Kristin Balko is very knowledgeable and involved. If you have any innovative partnership ideas. Wilmot gardens has a propagation greenhouse. If we could forge an alliance it would be awesome to have a bldg core of volunteers and leaders. Michael Adler had presented to the Master Gardeners and I Wendy Wilbur and I have talked about getting them involved, as they are at Wilmot and other locales.28.01.2015 at 02:14 pm
Crystal Hartman This is so very important! <3
27.01.2015 at 02:12 amLike
Miranda Castro hey Crystal - shall we do something?!
26.01.2015 at 05:17 pmLike
Crystal Hartman Having a crazy not great day. I will look at this ASAP and get back to you. <326.01.2015 at 06:43 pm1Miranda Castro no pressure - i'm not back yet ... :-)26.01.2015 at 07:31 pm

Seminole Pumpkin


The Seminole pumpkinĀ (Cucurbita moschata) is actually closer related to butternut and calabaza, than a real pumpkin. They usually grow in a more pumpkin-like shape than butternuts. The vines are aggressive and fast growing, achieving lengths of 20 feet or more. They like to climb, but the fruits usually pull them down.

Soil: Prefers rich soil with lots of organic matter and plenty of lime. Fertilizing also usually helps. The best vines usually volunteer from compost piles. Mulch heavily to control annual weeds and conserve water, but keep it half a foot back from the origin.
Water: These need plenty of water when they’re starting out, and may need irrigation throughout, depending on your soil’s capacity to provide water. Some people don’t care for their vines at all, and have good production. Avoid overheard watering, especially late in the day, as moisture can encourage gummy stem blight.
Sun: Full sun is usually recommended, but we find the vines wilt most of the day. Light shade would probably help reduce wilting time and therefore improve growth. Fruits can be sunburnt on hot summer days, if the older leaves that used to shade them wither away. We have solved that problem by intercropping with sweet potato.
Cold: This is a fairly long season squash, so I would not recommend a fall planting, but they could succeed if we don’t get any freezes till real late in the year.
Propagation: Seed. Every vine seems to be a little different. Take care not to cross with less rugged Cucurbita moschata, like butternuts. Plant as early as possible.
Pests: It resists powdery mildew, though its white leaf splotches are often mistaken for it. It resists vine borers, but not completely. Check for holes spilling wet sawdust, usually at a leaf or tendril joint (especially if a portion of the vine wilts). Split open the stem with a knife and remove the borer. A concentrated rotenone/pyrethrin spray can prevent them except that rain washes it off. Another type of borer infests the new fruits and flowers. I kill all I can to prevent their reproduction. They only attack the very young fruits, and seem to come in waves. You should get some production between the waves. A green caterpillar with white lines webs leaves together, rolls the edges, and especially favors the growing tips. They can be very destructive. BT spray or powder should control them. Seminole pumpkins are susceptible to gummy stem blight if you mulch up to the base.
Other problems: Will invade the rest of your garden and all your neighbor’s yards.

Harvesting, storage, and preparation: I like to wait till the stem turns brown just in case it might get a bit sweeter. They can also be eaten green, like a summer squash. Putting wood under the fruit can prevent damage from the ground. Some people leave them out long after the vine has died and they stay remarkably healthy. I’ve had shelf stored pumpkins last more than a year. They make excellent pumpkin pies, pumpkin soup, pumpkin bread, and anything else you might use a butternut or pumpkin for.
seminolepumpkin seminolepumpkin2
















More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search?sort=relevance&text=Cucurbita%20moschata

pdf – Seminole Pumpkin Information Sheet (to print out)



7 comments to Seminole Pumpkin

  • Claudia Cambigue

    Hi – This is the first I have heard of this Seminole Pumpkin. Anyone out there have a few seeds to share for our community garden??Thanks. Claudia

  • T. Gunderson

    You can locate Seminole Pumpkin seed as well as other heirloom seed from South Carolina Foundation Seed Association at 1162 Old Cherry Road, Clemson, SC 29636-9952.
    Phone: 864.656.2520 or cell no.: 864.650.5306 Mike Watkins. http://www.clemson.edu/seed. I ordered some seeds on Thursday, they arrived in California by Monday. Price for seed and shipping fees were very reasonable.

  • Rosemary

    I am growing the pumpkin this year. This plant/seed I will share with my garden club.

  • Bob

    I’m growing them for the first time this year and so far they are doing beautifully, sending out enormous white-mottled leaves and climbing up a large dead apricot tree. They seem happy to climb as long as the tendrils can find something to grab onto. No flowers yet but lots of buds.

  • Not telling so Anonamys

    I have a project about this and i made Pumpkin bread so this wuz very usefull info!

    Thanks,
    Anonamys

  • Bebe

    My son got 6 of these Seminole seeds from a friend of his and they have grown very well. They do not look like your picture however and when opened the first one had no seeds at all, not even little immature ones. We are wondering what is wrong so
    that we did not get seeds? This has never happened to us before and we grow all
    kinds of squash.

    Thanks for your help.
    Bebe

  • I asked Michael about this Bebe … he had never heard of that either. He wrote “Occasionally, some kinds of plants will make fruits that never got fertilized, but I’ve never heard of that with squash. Maybe it got fertilized with another kind of squash that turned out to be nonviable? That is still very strange. Do you have any pictures?”

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