Michael Adler I might get a load of pine bark Tuesday afternoon, and maybe some coffee grounds too. We're out of both and need them to mix soil. Anyone want to help?22.07.2014 at 01:08 am
Brian MonkeySoul Stanton Joni Ellis could use some volunteers this Saturday 830 - 1130 am, to help me manage the volunteers from UF. Could you explain more on what and why weSee More will be moving garden beds to the school and working on the loquats at the front road? It would be nice to have a couple people help me give guidance as to what needs to be done. I thought that was going to be you until you decided to go to the mushroom workshop. I have 14 volunteers from UF, I could use some help.See Less16.07.2014 at 10:34 pm
Michael Adler what time?16.07.2014 at 11:44 pmJoni Ellis Oh yeah, 8:30 am to 11:30 am17.07.2014 at 07:35 amview 6 more commentsBrian MonkeySoul Stanton Maybe make an event?17.07.2014 at 10:02 amMichael Adler Do you have enough tools for everyone?17.07.2014 at 11:14 amMichael Adler How did it go?20.07.2014 at 03:27 amJoni Ellis It went well, we got lots pulled out of there and I paid John Colburn to spray garlon on the stumps. There is more to do, but we have a great start on this. We need to keep up the work out there and get it ready to plant in October.20.07.2014 at 08:06 amBrian MonkeySoul Stanton Any other volunteers show and how many students? Good job20.07.2014 at 11:02 amJoni Ellis We had 10 students and a woman named Lisa Mac from EPP. Will and my neighbor Paul manned the chainsaws and the students put it on the trailer and we dumped it down the road where they are taking trees out anyway.

We got a lot done. There is more to be done to finish up and get new trees in. But this made a great start, now we can actually get into the area.

John Colburn came and sprayed herbicide on the stumps and sprouting vegetation like cherry laurel and paper mulberry. So let's get some EPP volunteers down there soon to finish this up. We can put some trees in before the end of august. Give them a head start on growing before they go dormant for the winter.
~ J20.07.2014 at 12:54 pm
Michael Adler No Volunteer Day Sunday

Hi everyone.

We have lots to do, but we will probably not be doing any of it this Sunday, unless someone else wants to head
See More things up. I'm going to be at the mushroom workshop. I can show someone how to prepare air layers. We need to do that to the grapes and the Chickasaw plum. It's pretty easy, but time consuming.

Michael


P.S. Here is a report from last week:

Last Wednesday was our monthly plant sale. Chris Neilubowicz helped load the trailer. I managed to recruit a volunteer at the market to help pull the trailer in. I set up the booth. Aunt Maggie came and I could finally go move my car. Brian and Gabriela came toward the end and helped. They helped pack up and Gabriela helped me put the unsold plants back.

On Sunday, I was joined today by Zot and new volunteer Paul. We worked in the Siembra garden. I sprayed the callaloo while Zot pulled crabgrass. When paul arrived, he also worked on pulling crabgrass while I hauled loads of mulch, and he also spread mulch. Eventually I decided I'd hauled all the mulch I could that day, and Paul had pulled all the weeds he could, so we switched. Eventually everyone had done everything. Paul had to go and Zot helped me finish up putting things away and applying some fertilizer to some plants. Zot also brought figs to share, and we all took home lamb's quarters.See Less
15.07.2014 at 12:06 am
Faith Carr Love hearing (reading) the update! Give an idea of what a workday at EPP is. I think maybe you have some sit down work even I could do! July is full to the brim, August awaits!15.07.2014 at 07:44 amDeborah Aldridge Sounds like a lovely couple of days. Can't wait until it's cooler so I can join you.16.07.2014 at 06:09 pm
Christopher Quire
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07.07.2014 at 12:37 pm
Michael Adler but they don't have that pest in their database!15.07.2014 at 12:06 am1
Michael Adler My calendar tells me people are coming on Saturday 7/19, to trim the trees by the loquats planted along the entrance road. It neglects to say who andSee More when and any contact information. Does anyone know anything about this?See Less08.07.2014 at 05:51 pm

Seminole Pumpkin


The Seminole pumpkinĀ (Cucurbita moschata) is actually closer related to butternut and calabaza, than a real pumpkin. They usually grow in a more pumpkin-like shape than butternuts. The vines are aggressive and fast growing, achieving lengths of 20 feet or more. They like to climb, but the fruits usually pull them down.

Soil: Prefers rich soil with lots of organic matter and plenty of lime. Fertilizing also usually helps. The best vines usually volunteer from compost piles. Mulch heavily to control annual weeds and conserve water, but keep it half a foot back from the origin.
Water: These need plenty of water when they’re starting out, and may need irrigation throughout, depending on your soil’s capacity to provide water. Some people don’t care for their vines at all, and have good production. Avoid overheard watering, especially late in the day, as moisture can encourage gummy stem blight.
Sun: Full sun is usually recommended, but we find the vines wilt most of the day. Light shade would probably help reduce wilting time and therefore improve growth. Fruits can be sunburnt on hot summer days, if the older leaves that used to shade them wither away. We have solved that problem by intercropping with sweet potato.
Cold: This is a fairly long season squash, so I would not recommend a fall planting, but they could succeed if we don’t get any freezes till real late in the year.
Propagation: Seed. Every vine seems to be a little different. Take care not to cross with less rugged Cucurbita moschata, like butternuts. Plant as early as possible.
Pests: It resists powdery mildew, though its white leaf splotches are often mistaken for it. It resists vine borers, but not completely. Check for holes spilling wet sawdust, usually at a leaf or tendril joint (especially if a portion of the vine wilts). Split open the stem with a knife and remove the borer. A concentrated rotenone/pyrethrin spray can prevent them except that rain washes it off. Another type of borer infests the new fruits and flowers. I kill all I can to prevent their reproduction. They only attack the very young fruits, and seem to come in waves. You should get some production between the waves. A green caterpillar with white lines webs leaves together, rolls the edges, and especially favors the growing tips. They can be very destructive. BT spray or powder should control them. Seminole pumpkins are susceptible to gummy stem blight if you mulch up to the base.
Other problems: Will invade the rest of your garden and all your neighbor’s yards.

Harvesting, storage, and preparation: I like to wait till the stem turns brown just in case it might get a bit sweeter. They can also be eaten green, like a summer squash. Putting wood under the fruit can prevent damage from the ground. Some people leave them out long after the vine has died and they stay remarkably healthy. I’ve had shelf stored pumpkins last more than a year. They make excellent pumpkin pies, pumpkin soup, pumpkin bread, and anything else you might use a butternut or pumpkin for.
seminolepumpkin seminolepumpkin2
















More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search?sort=relevance&text=Cucurbita%20moschata

pdf – Seminole Pumpkin Information Sheet (to print out)



5 comments to Seminole Pumpkin

  • Claudia Cambigue

    Hi – This is the first I have heard of this Seminole Pumpkin. Anyone out there have a few seeds to share for our community garden??Thanks. Claudia

  • T. Gunderson

    You can locate Seminole Pumpkin seed as well as other heirloom seed from South Carolina Foundation Seed Association at 1162 Old Cherry Road, Clemson, SC 29636-9952.
    Phone: 864.656.2520 or cell no.: 864.650.5306 Mike Watkins. http://www.clemson.edu/seed. I ordered some seeds on Thursday, they arrived in California by Monday. Price for seed and shipping fees were very reasonable.

  • Rosemary

    I am growing the pumpkin this year. This plant/seed I will share with my garden club.

  • Bob

    I’m growing them for the first time this year and so far they are doing beautifully, sending out enormous white-mottled leaves and climbing up a large dead apricot tree. They seem happy to climb as long as the tendrils can find something to grab onto. No flowers yet but lots of buds.

  • Not telling so Anonamys

    I have a project about this and i made Pumpkin bread so this wuz very usefull info!

    Thanks,
    Anonamys

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