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Crystal Hartman Hey Gainesville, EPP needs your help. We suffered a loss of plant stock!

The fridge that contained certain EPP plant stock malfunctioned and froze some items. Has anyone got any GA jet sweet potatoes
See More and/or turmeric?

I think everything else is fine. I do have some turmeric that can be planted, but need more. Our sweet potatoes completely froze.

Any help is greatly appreciated.See Less
28.02.2015 at 12:47 amLike
Crystal Hartman Family afternoon at the Nursery is tomorrow, Feb. 26 at the usual 4-6 time. I am really hoping to see some of you there.

Seriously, I hope some of you come because there have been mostly none of you coming
See More out. 2 or 3 people would be great. Consider this a finger wag from your EPP Nursery Mom. :)See Less
25.02.2015 at 07:25 pmLike
Crystal Hartman Green Sunday is TOMORROW Feb. 22 from noon to four. I will be out there for the first hour showing Evelyn the ropes, after which the reins will be in her hands for the day. Hoping to see some of you outSee More there. Thank you Evelyn!See Less21.02.2015 at 11:25 pmLike
Karen Epple sorry I missed this week my birthday, hope to make the nextone.25.02.2015 at 05:13 am
Kayla Susan Sosnow Hi, do you still have the Cherry of the Rio Grande (Eugenia aggregata) that's on your website? How does it do in our area? Are the cherries actually sweet? Do you have any other cherries? Thanks!22.02.2015 at 02:42 amLike
Michael Adler We had some when I left. They were very small. We had some more in very small pots that need to be up-potted. I seem to remember they were pretty good, not real cherries though. They grow slowly and usually lose their crop to a late frost. I was going to respond to your post about barbados cherries. I wasn't too keen on them when I tried them, and I think they're tropicals. Surinam cherries are also tripical, but will survive in warmer parts of Gainesville, but don't fruit, since they have to regrow from severe frost damage each year. We ordered a couple real cherries (like bing) from Willis Orchards, that supposedly have a low enough chill hour requirement that they should fruit here, if they can handle our humidity etc. We are going to plant them hopefully this spring and see how they do. You are welcome to order some from there and try them out too.22.02.2015 at 04:53 am1Kayla Susan Sosnow I saw those on their website. But when I Google cherry tree Zone 8 there are dozens of varieties available on a half dozen websites. It's overwhelming. I don't know how to sort out the truth from the lies.22.02.2015 at 05:02 amview 4 more commentsMichael Adler Zone 8 may not be good enough, especially if that's the edge of it's suitability zone. Look for something that lists the chill hours. Our area usually gets between 400 and 550, though it varies by location and we can expect a general warming trend. Lower chill hour requirements will still flower here, but may flower too soon, so may the later hour varieties since we seem to get warm spells during the winter, that confuses everything. It's hard to say, really, and it's very hard to accurately measure chill hour requirement. It's not well understood and there are even very divergent models for measuring chill hour credits. There also doesn't seem to be a standard source for chill hours for various varieties. I've looked into peaches a lot and find listings for the same varieties that vary 200 chill hours or more. Anyway, I found this website and it has some tasty looking trees I'd like to try. I LOVE rainier cherries. Anything 500 hours or less is probably worth trying. http://www.tytyga.com/Cherry-Trees-s/1834.htm22.02.2015 at 05:28 amKayla Susan Sosnow I saw that website too, & I figure on getting a variety that would be good to zone 9 in order to be safe on the chilling requirements. From what I've seen, Rainier just misses the mark because its only good to zone 8, not zone nine. Anyway I wish it wasn't going to take forever to figure this out! Thanks, Michael.22.02.2015 at 07:07 amMichael Adler make sure not to get one that needs a pollinizer, without also getting a pollinizer. Some are self-fertile, but probably no the best ones.22.02.2015 at 07:08 amKayla Susan Sosnow Right, but I didn't know self-fertile ones weren't as good. Why?22.02.2015 at 03:17 pm
Crystal Hartman EPP (and myself) need assistance! Please contact me if you are able to help with any of the following:

1) April 18, 2015. Spring Sustainability and Natural Foods Gala at Crones Cradle.

2) April 25 and/or
See More 26. Sow it Grows Farm Tour at the EPP nursery

3)This Sat. OR Sun. (2-21 OR 2-22) for about 4 hours to shovel horse sweepings (2 hours will be driving to and from High Springs). Woohoo!See Less
20.02.2015 at 06:09 pmLike
Gabriela Waschewsky Can't do 1 or 3, but I can help w/2 on the 25th.21.02.2015 at 12:44 am1
Edulis Exsto There it is....all the reason to plant decidious perenials and start building greenhouses of any size...."I thought Fl doesnt get cold"....
20.02.2015 at 12:22 pmLike
Herbert Adikt its one day. and the low is higher than the high in a good portion of the country. so no it really doesnt get that cold here. greenhouses are always a good idea tho :D20.02.2015 at 02:19 pmBrian MonkeySoul Stanton For sure, but many plants go out of dormant states, into growth mode and get damaged or they cant take below freezing.20.02.2015 at 03:51 pmview 3 more commentsHerbert Adikt ^oh mine are covered fo sho. a bit worried about the bamboo i planted in the fall. covered them in dec but forgot last night. its still looking hearty enough tho so i'm hoping for the best. im just sayin at least a greenhouse would help us. i dont think new england is gonna have any plants left soon lol20.02.2015 at 04:43 pmBrian MonkeySoul Stanton Ya I heard they grow mangos in Canada, soooo why not Gvl!?
My friend Craig Hepworth is a bamboo expert around here. I recall a photo of some in snow that lived. Is that right?20.02.2015 at 06:25 pm
Craig Hepworth Brian- Yeah, some kinds of bamboo can take down to -10F. Also, 'expert' is a relative term. Most people don't know much about bamboo, so you don't need to know much to be a bamboo 'expert'. Compared to many of the folks in the bamboo society, I'm a bamboo noob.20.02.2015 at 10:14 pm

Pindo Palm, Wine Palm, Jelly Palm (Butia capitata)


The Pindo Palm (Butia capitata a.k.a. Wine or Jelly Palm) is propagated from seed and generally reaches 12-15 feet in height.

Grown in full sun to partial shade, this perennial produces bright magenta flowers in the late spring and early summer.
It is quite cold-hardy and can handle temperatures in the teens with no sign of damage. It is also drought-resistant and resilient if relocated. Pindo palms thrive in a variety of soils, including alkaline, and is moderately salt-tolerant, though its roots and lower trunk can rot in soil which is kept too moist. Growth of this palm is slow; it may take many months to germinate. Though palm leaf skeletonizer, scale, and micronutrient deficiencies (appearing in soil with a high pH) present occasional challenges to the Pindo palm, these are not typically serious.

The plant’s date-sized fruit has a citrus-mango-coconut flavor, and makes great jams and jellies. The juice of the fruit can also be added to smoothies and tropical wines and liqueurs. Seeds can be roasted to make a coffee-flavored beverage.

pindopalmpindopalm_fruit1















More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search?sort=relevance&text=butia%20palm%20fruit

pdf – Pindo palm information sheet (to print out)

3 comments to Pindo Palm, Wine Palm, Jelly Palm (Butia capitata)

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