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Hi, we bought a bunch of plants on May 14th and we have one that none of us can remember what it is. (We were the 3 that helped weed and label) Could you please help me identify?
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I just sent out an email to everyone on the mailing list for the Home Propogation project. If you have anything that you would like to contribute for the EPP booth at the Florida Folk Festival next weekend, please let us know. The EPP nursery will be taking a break in the hot summer months and start sales again in the fall. You are welcome to continue propogating and rooting cuttings to have ready for the next season if you are able to nurture and water through the summer.

The following list are the plants folks have told me they are working on for propogation. If you have anything new to add, or plants that have failed (I've had my share that didn't go as planned or critters got into) or have already been brought in to the main nursery, please let me know so I can get the list updated.

Thank you everyone for all your hard work and all the great things we are accomplishing in the community.

Plant Variety
Avocado
Pavlownia Longata
Grape
Irish and Sweet Potato
Tomato (seed)
Pepper (seed)
Cassava
Plum Purple Heart
Rosemary
Rosemary
Spearmint
Parsley
Cilantro
Grape Isor
Rasberry Caroline
Blueberry GA Early & Brienbata
Blackberry Thornless
Grapes Muscadines (up to 9 varieties)
Mulberry Everbearing
Katuk
Grapes
New - open
New - open
New - open
Sweet Potatoes Purple
Grapes Muscadine
Blueberry
Blackberry
Open
Pear Dudley
Rose Bush Carefree Beauty (for hips)
Strawberry Heirloom
Grapes Muscadine
Fig
Blackberry
Rasberry
Sweet Potatoes
Passion Fruit Tropical (not for beginner)
Rosemary
Moringa
Blueberry
Seed propogation
Banana Orinoco
Elderberry
Blueberry
Grapes Muscadine
Turks Cap
Lemon Grass
Tumeric
Ginger Thai
Cranberry Hibiscus
Sugar Cane
Roselle
Longevity Spinach
Okinawa Spinach
Cuban Oregano
Cranberry Hibiscus
Cassava
Moringa
Aloe Vera
Sacha Inchi Nut plukenetia volubilis
Pomegranate?
Tomato (seed)
Plum Chickasaw
Spiderwort
Sunchoke
Avocado Gainesville
Cranberry Hibiscus
Lemon Grass
Guava Strawberry
Open
Flowering Thyme
Pepper (seed)
Spearmint
Chocolate Mint
Loquats
Taro
Tumeric
Open
Tumeric
Spearmint
Prickly Pear
Tomatoes
Figs
Sweet Potatoes
Sugar Cane 2 types
Cactus Thornless
Loquats
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Greetings from the EPP Nursery! I have just taken inventory of the plants we have available for sale. Get yours soon before we take them all to the Florida Folk Festival on May 26 - 28 in White Springs. One gallon pots unless otherwise noted. Here's the list:

20 roselle 6" pots 2/$5
25 cranberry hibiscus 6" pots 2/$5
15 spearmint
10 bee balm/horse mint
30 lemongrass
14 Cuban oregano
10 longevity spinach
10 okinowa spinach
40 elderberry
26 arrowroot
5 Florida spinach 3 gal pots $10
10 pomegranate
1 flatwood plums
3 moringa
4 katuk 3 gallon
10 figs
25 mulberry
24 taro
50 sugarcane
25 loquat
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Ok. Folk Fest. Who is going and on what days? ... See MoreSee Less

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Pacific Spinach

Pacific Spinach (Abelmoschus manihot; formerly Hibiscus manihot) is a fast-growing, edible hibiscus is an excellent warm weather green vegetable that can be eaten raw for maximum nutrition! It is one of the world’s most nutritious leafy green vegetable due to its high protein content.  Though not yet seen flowering by Edible Plant Project growers, the blooms of this species come in late summer and are a brilliant pale yellow with a dark purple center with a diameter of 6 inches. In Japan the roots are used to create a paste for making paper.

Soil & Water:  Thrives in moist and fertile, well-drained soil. This hardy plant tolerates a range of soils, from sand to clay and acidic to alkaline. For best growing results, soil must be kept moist. May also be grown as a potted specimen.
Sun: Full sun. This plant will not thrive in shade.
Cold:  Hardy to zone 9; frost tender. Will come back from the roots in north Florida.
Pruning: Allow stalks to reach mature height for blooming. Pruning main stalk will promote branching.
Propagation:  Brings cuttings in overwinter to get head start on growing season. Cuttings taken in spring may reach heights of 6 ft. by fall. Sow seeds in March.
Pests: Grasshoppers eat holes in the leaves. We don’t know of any others.

Harvesting, storage, and preparation: Tender, sweet leaves are best eaten raw. Flower petals make an attractive addition to salads. The leaves can be cooked as well, and used to wrap other ingredients.
Lau pele aibika pacific spinach slippery cabbage Lau pele aibika pacific spinach slippery cabbage2

More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search?sort=relevance&text=Abelmoschus%20manihot

pdf – Information sheet to print out

2 comments to Pacific Spinach

  • Taylor

    Where can I find either a plant, seeds, or a cutting? I would love to grow this. I am in Florida and am interested in either local or buying online. Any information would be helpful, thank you!!

  • barbara nickou

    grows well on Molokai,great for green smoothies,very good for digestion

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