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The last Sunday of October is 29th. What shall we do? ... See MoreSee Less

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Carolina Madera created an event for Edible Plant Project (.org). ... See MoreSee Less

Edible Plants at Barter Market

October 21, 2017, 9:30am - October 21, 2017, 12:30pm

Let's talk plants and how to get shovels in the ground to grow food on our own backyards for our are...

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We won't be at 2nd Wed till we get more volunteers. Alternatives are October 3rd Monday Meeting 7pm 10 ave between 6th & main st Forage & Working Food and 23rd October Gainesville Area Barter Group Market 9:30 am.

Edible Plant Project will have a small table with free to good home plants and I will bring all the Cranberry Hibiscus (false roselle) & regula Roselle that EPP has in green house.

Photo is of Surinam Spinach which there is at least 10+ tiny plants that need good homes.
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Edible Plants at 3rd Monday Meeting

October 16, 2017, 7:00pm - October 16, 2017, 9:00pm

Edible Plant Project will have a small table with free to good home plants and Carolina will bring a...

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Less than 2 minutes animation of how science finding that plants help each other. Big trees helping little seedlings and cross species communities.

One day we can use this information to work with nature (weeds, pests, etc...).
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You can't hear it, but trees actually are speaking to one another.

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Are these eatable ?? ... See MoreSee Less

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Okinawa spinach

This attractive perennial green leafy vegetable (Gynura bicolor) has half purple, half dark green leaves that make a delicious addition to salads. It can be cooked like spinach – but don’t overcook it as it can become unpleasantly slimy. Gently steamed or stir fried is best!

It propagates well from cuttings: you must take the cuttings before winter as the plant will not survive a freeze. As with most cuttings, remove all but the top few leaves of a cutting to reduce water loss until it grows new roots. Rooting is very slow in cold weather. Rooting the cutting in water first so that it forms good roots before planting in order to improve results.

Okinawa lettuce can be used in landscaping as a ground cover in full sun or it does well in partial shade. It only needs a little soil amending/fertilizing from time to time. It doesn’t need a lot of water but it does need some – especially if planted in full sun.

More information: http://hihort.blogspot.com/2013/04/okinawan-spinach-gynura-bicolor.html

There are some cooking tips in the comments below and also some recipes here.

More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search/?q=okinawa%20spinach

pdf – Okinawa spinach information sheet (to print out).

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12 comments to Okinawa spinach

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