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Crystal Hartman This Sunday (6-21) come celebrate the solstice with EPP. I will be there from 8 am to 12 pm.

A most excellent breakfast will be provided. Come hungry, bring water.

Use www.edibleplantproject.org/nursery/directions
See More to get there.See Less
18.06.2015 at 09:47 pmLike
Evelyn Giansanti Reedy If I am in town I will try to stop by. You are a fabulous cook! The plan as of today is to be in Cocoa Beach.18.06.2015 at 10:23 pm1Crystal Hartman I like your plan a lot. Go with it!18.06.2015 at 10:24 pm1view 2 more commentsEdulis Exsto Crystal Hartman, we are grateful for your early discipline to help others beat the heat!18.06.2015 at 10:28 pm1Nancy Hendler Crystal, Thank you for starting so early. (Y)19.06.2015 at 12:53 am1
Joni Ellis This is not plant related, however, if you are interested in raising food, this may be of interest. I am harvesting more chickens this friday from 8-noon at Crazy Woman Farm. If anyone is interested inSee More helping and learning a new skill. Just thought I would share. Thanks for all everyone is doing to keep EPP alive. Smiles.See Less17.06.2015 at 08:27 pmLike
Crystal Hartman Thank you to the volunteers who made this past Sunday such a success! We had six volunteers including Norman Biegner, Jamey Sadler, Jojo Gardens, Tad DeGroat, Annette Gilley, and Emily.

So much was accomplished
See More including a LOT of weeding, up-potting, fertilizing and general cleaning.

For those who didn't make it, you missed a fabulous breakfast of my farm eggs, fruit salad of mango, pineapple and strawberries, Ezekiel bread by Norm and grapefruit. Hope to see more of you next Sunday!See Less
15.06.2015 at 02:29 pmLike
Tad DeGroat Birds Nest fungus. common in compost. Crucibulum-5 different varieties.15.06.2015 at 06:20 pm2Crystal Hartman What an odd little fungus. Glad to meet it!15.06.2015 at 06:23 pm1view 1 more commentsTad DeGroat The spheres or eggs are full of spores.15.06.2015 at 06:29 pm1
Edulis Exsto Probing for new board members and committee chair nominations so we can have our election. This is a nonprofit.11.06.2015 at 10:55 pmLike
Marla Barak Sanders ABOUT SARE
SARE is a grant-making and outreach program. Its mission is to advance—to the whole of American agriculture— innovations that improve profitability, stewardship, and quality of life by investing in groundbreaking research and education.
Since it began in 1988, SARE has funded more than 5,000 projects around the nation that explore innovations, from rotational grazing to direct marketing to cover crops—and many other best practices. Administering SARE grants are four regional councils composed of farmers, ranchers, researchers, educators, and other local experts, and coordinators in every state and island protectorate run education programs for ag professionals. SARE Outreach publishes practical books, bulletins, online resources, and other information for farmers and ranchers. All of SARE’s activities are funded by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Guided by the belief that healthy soil is the foundation of healthy agriculture, SARE has made soil quality research and education a cornerstone of its project portfolio—and made Building Soils for Better Crops one of its signature handbooks. This new, all-color edition is an authoritative text on soil health, detailing the latest research and experi- ences of soil scientists—many of whom are SARE grant participants, including the book’s authors. Some other SARE titles that might be of interest to Building Soils readers: (Books) Managing Cover Crops Profitably, third edition; The New American Farmer, second edition; Crop Rotation on Organic Farms; (Bulletins) Diversifying Cropping Systems; Transitioning to Organic Production; and Smart Water Use on Your Farm or Ranch.
For more information about SARE’s grant-making program and information products, visit www.sare.org or con- tact: SARE Outreach, 1122 Patapsco Bldg., University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-6715; info@sare.org; (301) 405-8020.
SARE’s four regional offices and outreach office work to advance sustainable innovations to the whole of American agriculture.14.06.2015 at 01:32 am2
Crystal Hartman Please contact me directly through message or at 352-214-8179 if you are interested in a board position, including officers.15.06.2015 at 02:31 pm1
Crystal Hartman Please share with your friends! This Sunday 9-1
11.06.2015 at 01:06 pmLike

Okinawa Spinach and Grits

Submitted by Campfire Dan Okinawa Spinach (Gynura crepioides) is a decorative green and purple, tall, shade-loving ground cover with edible leaves. okinawa-spinach-leaves2 My friends in Hawaii tell me it is renowned there along with its all green cousin as a cholesterol lowering food but I like it just because I believe that greens need to be a part of every meal and this one grows remarkably easily. It dies to the ground each winter but comes right back in the spring. Some people eat it in salads but I've found I eat far more greens if I cook them with other foods I like so I made up this breakfast recipe. It would work just as well for a quick hearty lunch. This recipe is good for 1-2 moderately hungry people! Ingredients: 1/2 cup coarsely chopped Okinawa Spinach leaves 1/4 cup Yellow Corn Grits 1 1/4 cup water 1 rounded tablespoon TVP (optional) Salt and Pepper to taste 1 tablespoon margarine (or butter) Topping (see below) Coarsely chop a handful of Okinawa Spinach leaves to about 1/4 cup packed tight. leaves-coarsely-chopped1 Microwave or simmer the corn grits in the water for about 3 minutes. They should be still soupy so adjust the time for your microwave or keep an eye on the pot if boiling on the stove! Add the coarsely chopped Okinawa Spinach leaves and microwave or simmer for another 1-2 minutes or until the grits firm up. add-chopped-leaves-to-partially-cooked-grits1 Garnish with some whole Okinawa Spinach leaves. I serve this to my vegan friends (and myself) topped as shown with vegan margarine and vegetarian nutritional yeast (one to two tablespoons of yeast per serving). My non-vegan friends like it with butter and/or various shredded cheeses as a topping and without the optional textured vegetable protein (TVP). serve-with-topping-and-garnish1 This recipe might as easily be called "Grits and Greens" since it works with just about any green you can eat raw or partially cooked. I've cooked it with regular spinach, India Lettuce (Lactuca indica), and the perennial leaf crops Pacific Spinach (Abelmoschus esculentus), Katuk (Sauropis androgynus) and Moringa leaves (Moringa oleifera). I like it with Okinawa Spinach best.

4 comments to Okinawa Spinach and Grits

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