Miranda Castro
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29.09.2014 at 11:58 pm
Barbara Volk Thanks for adding me. I am in West Virginia and am a huge believer of edible gardening. I will be building my green house next summer,and in the mean time have a very sunny room to bring in the plants that won't survive the winter here.01.10.2014 at 01:41 pm
Michael Adler Hey, I just heard the Co-op is looking for a new home for the two fig trees growing in their planters. They were originally from us, but are much largerSee More now. They should be cut back when transplanted, unless it's early next spring, when they don't have any leaves. It will still take a lot of watering to get them settled.See Less
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08.09.2014 at 09:48 pm
Michael Adler I think they were Texas blue giant and maybe a jelly.08.09.2014 at 09:49 pmAnnette Gilley Do they need to be moved right away? I would love to adopt at least one of them.08.09.2014 at 10:59 pmview 2 more commentsMichael Adler I don't know. Ask McTimberwolf08.09.2014 at 11:00 pmSusannah Grace Darbyshire Are they still available?26.09.2014 at 09:42 pm
Michael Adler Hey, I was thinking of trying to harvest callaloo seeds again today, after work, since we have nice weather and might not again for a while. Can anyoneSee More help? I know it's short notice, but thought I'd try. I really need a helper to hold the bin up while I shake the seedheads into it and vice-versa.See Less18.09.2014 at 05:09 pm
Valerie Anderson :/18.09.2014 at 07:58 pmMichael Adler Thanks Maureen for helping!18.09.2014 at 08:55 pm1view 1 more commentsEdulis Exsto Is this posted on all the agriculture club sites & the meet up? Can we start? Anyone want to Twitter for us?19.09.2014 at 07:48 pm
Michael Adler I didn't send out one of these last week because I expected plenty of help at the nursery, as I do again this Sunday, but I like to keep you in the loop,See More for those of you who read these things.

Delta Nu Zeta is sending some members to us this Sunday. We will probably pull weeds, collect seeds, and maybe plant a thing or two.

Anyone else is still welcome to come, but I might have a hard time finding enough things for everyone to do. If anyone else would like to help coordinate volunteers, on the other hand, that might be useful.

Michael

P.S. Here is a report from the last couple weeks:

9/7/14: After my usual rounds checking on everything, Annette came to help. I don't remember everything we did, but there was some weed-pulling and we went to the garden and harvested lots of black callaloo by shaking it into a large bin. We also planted most of the yellow strawberry guava seeds we extracted the week before, into three large pots and covered them with screen. We only had three pieces of fiberglass screen, and nothing to cut the metal screen with, so we had some seeds left over.

9/10/14: Chris Neilubowicz helped load. Aunt Maggie and Joey helped set up the booth. I gave an interview to a group from FYCS working on a class project on nonprofits, and they planned to come volunteer at the nursery on Sundday. Some also helped with the sale. Brian helped at the booth a lot and also gave an interview. Gabriella stopped by for a bit too. Joey helped unload the plants at the nursery.

9/14/14: I started by mixing up some scythe organic herbicide and spraying lots of Chamaesyce weeds around the nursery. After that, the group from FYCS came. We went to the garden at Siembra to harvest callaloo seeds, but as soon as I was showing them how, we started getting rained on. We took shelter inside Siembra's seedling greenhouse and made friends with a fence lizard. When the rain stopped, we went back to the nursery and I started them on weeding and cutting free the pots that were growing into the ground. I pulled one away to help me plant the last yellow strawberry guava seeds and then we up-potted our last yellow strawberry guava plant. The group left. I up-potted two more strawberry guavas, cleaned and tested the greenhouse heater, investigated why the second row of the main plant area was looking very dry, and discovered a kink in the hose. I ran the sprinklers on them and planted 8 sugar canes.See Less
17.09.2014 at 11:36 pm
Faith Carr Love the update! Good stuff.18.09.2014 at 07:50 am
Bailey Abda Hey people,
I just moved here from Tampa and am looking to get more involved in the permie/herbal/gardening community.
Any suggestions/events, etc would
See More be greatly appreciated!See Less
16.09.2014 at 11:19 am
Michael Adler Is anyone interested in leading a volunteer group one Saturday or week day evening? A pre-pharmacy organization has offered to help, but I'm not availableSee More most of those times.See Less08.09.2014 at 10:57 pm
Michael Adler Anyone interested in volunteering or interning with nextjenclimate.org to promote climate issues in the upcoming election please contact Trenton BrooksSee More brooks_trenton@yahoo.comSee Less04.09.2014 at 06:50 pm

Moringa


The Moringa oleifera (Drumstick or Horseradish Tree) is a beautiful, fast growing tree (up to 15 feet in a year) with a shady, leaf canopy of very attractive ferny foliage. Small, waxy, creamy-white flowers, resembling miniature orchids, form in clusters, followed by 8-12 inches long round pods that look like drumsticks, hence one of the plant’s common names. The shell of the pod contains a row of neatly packed, wing-edged, round, brown seeds. Mature Moringa trees flower year round, providing lots of nectar for honey bees and a continuous supply of drumsticks for the kitchen. Moringa trees grow extensively in tropical, sub-tropical and warm temperature areas, including Africa, India, South East Asia where it said to grow in the sandiest, driest, most godforsaken places on earth – it is even tolerant of drought, salt and neglect! Moringa has a wondrous array of uses with virtually every part of the tree useful in the kitchen, as medicine or for industry.

Planting:
Plant young trees in well-drained soil in a sunny, frost-free position. They need to be protected from strong winds and frost especially when young. Once trees have had 1-2 winters in colder climates, they do adapt, but may go dormant in winter. In Gainesville, Moringas will freeze in the winter and resprout from the stump in the spring. Protect the base of the tree from frost to ensure resprouting. Stop apical dominance to keep tree short.
Fertilization
: The soils of arid regions (to which moringas are adapted) are typically less weathered and therefore contain more of the soluble minerals that plants need, than the soils of humid regions. To get all that potassium, iron, and calcium from moringa leaves, the soil must have those minerals for the tree to extract (lots more potassium and calcium than Iron). For protein, they need fixed nitrogen and a bit of sulfur. For other processes they need magnesium, phosphorous, and tiny amounts of “micronutrients“. Magnesium deficiency is common in North Fl soils.
Pruning: Young trees should be trimmed and pruned regularly otherwise they can grow 30-50 feet tall. The trunk and branches can be used as living stakes for climbing vegetables. A row of trees can be planted close together to create a living fence.
Propagation: By seed or cuttings.
Nutrition: The leaves are 38% protein with all essential amino acids. They contain 2 x the protein of milk/yoghurt (the highest protein ratio of any plant on earth), and 4 x the calcium of milk, 3 x the potassium of bananas, 4 x the vitamin A of carrots, 7 x the vitamin C of oranges and 3 x the iron of red meat. They contain omega 3, 6 and 9 fatty acids as well as antioxidants and phytonutrients. Moringa leaves are an excellent source of nutrition and a natural energy booster that is not based on sugar, and so it is sustained. Some consider Moringa protein better than soy as it is non-allergic. Moringa contains 18 of the 20 amino acids required by the human body including all eight of the essential amino acids found in meat products.Medicinal uses: A folk remedy for stomach complaints, catarrh, hay fever, impotence, edema, cramps, hemorrhoids, headaches, sore gums; to strengthen the eyes and the brain, liver, gall, digestive, respiratory and immune system, as a blood cleanser and blood builder, and for cancer treatment. Moringa (Ben) oil is used for earache and in ointments for skin conditions. The oil rubbed on the skin is said to prevent mosquitoes from biting. Flowers infused in honey are used as a cough remedy.
Other uses: Moringa oil is the most stable oil in nature (it does not go rancid) and it is used in perfumery, lubricating watches and fine machinery. Ground Moringa seeds are used for water purification.

Culinary Uses:
The leaves can be cooked in any recipe that calls for spinach. The leaflets can be pulled off stalks and boiled as any green or added to soups or rice. Tender growing tips can be cooked stem and all or they can be dried and powdered and sprinkled into soups and stews.The flowers are edible and can be sprinkled on salads: they taste deliciously sweet at first then a spicy/horseradishy finish! The young drumsticks can be cooked like asparagus – they taste like peas with a mild mustard taste. Sliced, young green pods can be used in savory and meat dishes. The young (green) seeds can be cooked and eaten like peas. Mature seeds can be fried or roasted and taste like peanuts or pressed for an oil that is healthier than olive oil. Seeds can be sprouted like wheat grass and eaten as tender nutritious greens. Roots of young seedlings taste like horseradish, and are often grated and used as a substitute.

Moringa Recipes courtesy of www.echonet.org
More information about the Moringa tree from Trees for Life and Echo

800px-moringa_flower_5moringaleaves2moringa2

 












More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search/?q=Moringa%20oleifera
EPP Moringa info sheet (pdf)

1 comment to Moringa

  • Art

    You make me excited with this great information! I always thought India was best known for the Engineers and Gurus. LOL. Anyhow, living in Florida is great. We pretty much eat a starch, fruit and vegetable based selection of food. I use lentils and nuts and seeds sparingly. Greens and starches go well together. I will find a source for the trees and do the grow thing. Thanks very much. Art

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