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Crystal Hartman This Sunday (6-21) come celebrate the solstice with EPP. I will be there from 8 am to 12 pm.

A most excellent breakfast will be provided. Come hungry, bring water.

Use www.edibleplantproject.org/nursery/directions
See More to get there.See Less
18.06.2015 at 09:47 pmLike
Evelyn Giansanti Reedy If I am in town I will try to stop by. You are a fabulous cook! The plan as of today is to be in Cocoa Beach.18.06.2015 at 10:23 pm1Crystal Hartman I like your plan a lot. Go with it!18.06.2015 at 10:24 pm1view 2 more commentsEdulis Exsto Crystal Hartman, we are grateful for your early discipline to help others beat the heat!18.06.2015 at 10:28 pm1Nancy Hendler Crystal, Thank you for starting so early. (Y)19.06.2015 at 12:53 am1
Joni Ellis This is not plant related, however, if you are interested in raising food, this may be of interest. I am harvesting more chickens this friday from 8-noon at Crazy Woman Farm. If anyone is interested inSee More helping and learning a new skill. Just thought I would share. Thanks for all everyone is doing to keep EPP alive. Smiles.See Less17.06.2015 at 08:27 pmLike
Crystal Hartman Thank you to the volunteers who made this past Sunday such a success! We had six volunteers including Norman Biegner, Jamey Sadler, Jojo Gardens, Tad DeGroat, Annette Gilley, and Emily.

So much was accomplished
See More including a LOT of weeding, up-potting, fertilizing and general cleaning.

For those who didn't make it, you missed a fabulous breakfast of my farm eggs, fruit salad of mango, pineapple and strawberries, Ezekiel bread by Norm and grapefruit. Hope to see more of you next Sunday!See Less
15.06.2015 at 02:29 pmLike
Tad DeGroat Birds Nest fungus. common in compost. Crucibulum-5 different varieties.15.06.2015 at 06:20 pm2Crystal Hartman What an odd little fungus. Glad to meet it!15.06.2015 at 06:23 pm1view 1 more commentsTad DeGroat The spheres or eggs are full of spores.15.06.2015 at 06:29 pm1
Edulis Exsto Probing for new board members and committee chair nominations so we can have our election. This is a nonprofit.11.06.2015 at 10:55 pmLike
Marla Barak Sanders ABOUT SARE
SARE is a grant-making and outreach program. Its mission is to advance—to the whole of American agriculture— innovations that improve profitability, stewardship, and quality of life by investing in groundbreaking research and education.
Since it began in 1988, SARE has funded more than 5,000 projects around the nation that explore innovations, from rotational grazing to direct marketing to cover crops—and many other best practices. Administering SARE grants are four regional councils composed of farmers, ranchers, researchers, educators, and other local experts, and coordinators in every state and island protectorate run education programs for ag professionals. SARE Outreach publishes practical books, bulletins, online resources, and other information for farmers and ranchers. All of SARE’s activities are funded by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Guided by the belief that healthy soil is the foundation of healthy agriculture, SARE has made soil quality research and education a cornerstone of its project portfolio—and made Building Soils for Better Crops one of its signature handbooks. This new, all-color edition is an authoritative text on soil health, detailing the latest research and experi- ences of soil scientists—many of whom are SARE grant participants, including the book’s authors. Some other SARE titles that might be of interest to Building Soils readers: (Books) Managing Cover Crops Profitably, third edition; The New American Farmer, second edition; Crop Rotation on Organic Farms; (Bulletins) Diversifying Cropping Systems; Transitioning to Organic Production; and Smart Water Use on Your Farm or Ranch.
For more information about SARE’s grant-making program and information products, visit www.sare.org or con- tact: SARE Outreach, 1122 Patapsco Bldg., University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-6715; info@sare.org; (301) 405-8020.
SARE’s four regional offices and outreach office work to advance sustainable innovations to the whole of American agriculture.14.06.2015 at 01:32 am2
Crystal Hartman Please contact me directly through message or at 352-214-8179 if you are interested in a board position, including officers.15.06.2015 at 02:31 pm1
Crystal Hartman Please share with your friends! This Sunday 9-1
11.06.2015 at 01:06 pmLike

Moringa


The Moringa oleifera (Drumstick or Horseradish Tree) is a beautiful, fast growing tree (up to 15 feet in a year) with a shady, leaf canopy of very attractive ferny foliage. Small, waxy, creamy-white flowers, resembling miniature orchids, form in clusters, followed by 8-12 inches long round pods that look like drumsticks, hence one of the plant’s common names. The shell of the pod contains a row of neatly packed, wing-edged, round, brown seeds. Mature Moringa trees flower year round, providing lots of nectar for honey bees and a continuous supply of drumsticks for the kitchen. Moringa trees grow extensively in tropical, sub-tropical and warm temperature areas, including Africa, India, South East Asia where it said to grow in the sandiest, driest, most godforsaken places on earth - it is even tolerant of drought, salt and neglect! Moringa has a wondrous array of uses with virtually every part of the tree useful in the kitchen, as medicine or for industry.

Planting:
Plant young trees in well-drained soil in a sunny, frost-free position. They need to be protected from strong winds and frost especially when young. Once trees have had 1-2 winters in colder climates, they do adapt, but may go dormant in winter. In Gainesville, Moringas will freeze in the winter and resprout from the stump in the spring. Protect the base of the tree from frost to ensure resprouting. Stop apical dominance to keep tree short.
Fertilization
: The soils of arid regions (to which moringas are adapted) are typically less weathered and therefore contain more of the soluble minerals that plants need, than the soils of humid regions. To get all that potassium, iron, and calcium from moringa leaves, the soil must have those minerals for the tree to extract (lots more potassium and calcium than Iron). For protein, they need fixed nitrogen and a bit of sulfur. For other processes they need magnesium, phosphorous, and tiny amounts of “micronutrients“. Magnesium deficiency is common in North Fl soils.
Pruning: Young trees should be trimmed and pruned regularly otherwise they can grow 30-50 feet tall. The trunk and branches can be used as living stakes for climbing vegetables. A row of trees can be planted close together to create a living fence.
Propagation: By seed or cuttings.
Nutrition: The leaves are 38% protein with all essential amino acids. They contain 2 x the protein of milk/yoghurt (the highest protein ratio of any plant on earth), and 4 x the calcium of milk, 3 x the potassium of bananas, 4 x the vitamin A of carrots, 7 x the vitamin C of oranges and 3 x the iron of red meat. They contain omega 3, 6 and 9 fatty acids as well as antioxidants and phytonutrients. Moringa leaves are an excellent source of nutrition and a natural energy booster that is not based on sugar, and so it is sustained. Some consider Moringa protein better than soy as it is non-allergic. Moringa contains 18 of the 20 amino acids required by the human body including all eight of the essential amino acids found in meat products.Medicinal uses: A folk remedy for stomach complaints, catarrh, hay fever, impotence, edema, cramps, hemorrhoids, headaches, sore gums; to strengthen the eyes and the brain, liver, gall, digestive, respiratory and immune system, as a blood cleanser and blood builder, and for cancer treatment. Moringa (Ben) oil is used for earache and in ointments for skin conditions. The oil rubbed on the skin is said to prevent mosquitoes from biting. Flowers infused in honey are used as a cough remedy.
Other uses: Moringa oil is the most stable oil in nature (it does not go rancid) and it is used in perfumery, lubricating watches and fine machinery. Ground Moringa seeds are used for water purification.

Culinary Uses:
The leaves can be cooked in any recipe that calls for spinach. The leaflets can be pulled off stalks and boiled as any green or added to soups or rice. Tender growing tips can be cooked stem and all or they can be dried and powdered and sprinkled into soups and stews.The flowers are edible and can be sprinkled on salads: they taste deliciously sweet at first then a spicy/horseradishy finish! The young drumsticks can be cooked like asparagus - they taste like peas with a mild mustard taste. Sliced, young green pods can be used in savory and meat dishes. The young (green) seeds can be cooked and eaten like peas. Mature seeds can be fried or roasted and taste like peanuts or pressed for an oil that is healthier than olive oil. Seeds can be sprouted like wheat grass and eaten as tender nutritious greens. Roots of young seedlings taste like horseradish, and are often grated and used as a substitute.

Moringa Recipes courtesy of www.echonet.org
More information about the Moringa tree from Trees for Life and Echo

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More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search/?q=Moringa%20oleifera
EPP Moringa info sheet (pdf)

5 comments to Moringa

  • Art

    You make me excited with this great information! I always thought India was best known for the Engineers and Gurus. LOL. Anyhow, living in Florida is great. We pretty much eat a starch, fruit and vegetable based selection of food. I use lentils and nuts and seeds sparingly. Greens and starches go well together. I will find a source for the trees and do the grow thing. Thanks very much. Art

  • Jenny

    Moringa is delicious! However, as a note – I have heard that if you are a woman attempting to get pregnant, you should avoid eating moringa, since it can prevent conception. It’s supposed to be a wonderful aid to lactation, however.

  • thanks for your question jenny – this blog posting addresses it nicely – looks like the leaves are ok but the flowers/roots are not … http://herbladyisintoday.blogspot.com/2012/07/does-moringa-interfere-with-hormonal.html

  • Carole Worthington

    Do you sell moringa trees. Do they grow in this area? Carole Worthington

  • We do Carole and they do grow up here in north central florida – they need protection in the winter and even so they tend to die back then but re-grow the following spring

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