Michael Adler https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/alachua-county-farmers-market-ebt-program/
Attachment UnavailableThis attachment may have been removed or the person who shared it may not have permission to share it with you.
31.10.2014 at 07:14 pm
Edulis Exsto Forcast says low of 35 Saturday, protect your vulnerable plants. Any volunteers to help close and open the greenhouse this winter? Contact Michael.
30.10.2014 at 06:33 pm
Deborah Aldridge I was just posting about that on the Florida Gardening Friends group. I'm working now to make room, and will bring as much as I can indoors.30.10.2014 at 07:07 pm
Gabriela Waschewsky Here's the invitation to the November Earthskills benefit party. DIY water catchment, fermentation demo, trade blanket, more skills sharing... Bring yourSee More instruments and join the jam!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1005311926153022/?ref_newsfeed_story_type=regularSee Less
Attachment UnavailableThis attachment may have been removed or the person who shared it may not have permission to share it with you.
21.10.2014 at 06:59 am
Michael Adler request for interviewees:

So EPP grows a lot of plants that are popular in various places around the world that are not here. We try to promote useful
See More edible plants that grow well here, and need promotion because many people around here are not familiar with them. Sometimes we meet people from places where our plants are popular, and they're often very happy to become re-acquainted with them. We are looking for such people for interviews for a story on WUFT.

I've been talking with Maleeha with WUFT. She wants to do a story on EPP, and wants to do it from the angle I just described. If this sounds like you, please call or email Maleeha at 850-319-3278 and maleeha.babar@gmail.comSee Less
13.10.2014 at 08:45 pm
Noelle S. Ward I'm in!!!!!13.10.2014 at 09:10 pmMichael Adler cool. Which plants connect you with your cultural traditions?13.10.2014 at 09:26 pmview 5 more commentsNoelle S. Ward Well being a whitebread Florida girl with a heart in the islands, I would say finding sorrel and learning how to grow it and use it and lemongrass for my love of many uses. My cultural traditions probably would not fit into this story but I'm a big fan of EPP!13.10.2014 at 09:40 pm1Lara MacGibbon We appreciate the unique selection EPP offers. My partner, (farm hand at Frog Song) is from Dominica in the Carribean. He has a strong connection to sorrel and caliloo.. plus many others.13.10.2014 at 10:53 pm1Michael Adler Is he interested in contacting the reporter?13.10.2014 at 11:06 pm1Lara MacGibbon Yes, I forwarded her information to him.13.10.2014 at 11:43 pmEdulis Exsto By when? If she wants a good story, it should have notice. This is the first I heard.
Eing and Sam? Maybe also Veronica?14.10.2014 at 01:26 pm
Michael Adler I'm interested in an expensive tool to maintain our orchard. it's currently growing 7' tall weeds, bidens and other things. Once we get more trees inSee More there, it will be more complicated to keep under control, and we've completely failed at it this year. What I think would be the best tool for it is something Stihl calls a "power scythe." It's like a short hedge-trimmer at the end of a weed-whacker-like machine. It's part of their "kombi system", where the engine and attachments are sold separately, so that one engine can operate many kinds of tools. I'm also interested in their pole chainsaw and maybe a string trimmer would be nice. You can also get a small rototiller attachment. To get just the motor and power-scythe attachment is going to be $600. Other brands sell similar tools for cheaper, but I know Stihl makes quality products, and I'm suspicious about the cheap ones. What do you think? Is this a worthwhile investment for us? EPP has plenty of cash right now.See Less05.10.2014 at 10:15 pm
Craig Hepworth How big is the area that needs to be maintained?06.10.2014 at 09:12 amFaith Carr Yes. No qualifiers. Good professional equipment is always worth the extra cost when there is years worth of work ahead. A trial crop or first timer stuff? No. You've been at this long enough to have 'earned' the right to quality tools that will promote quality product. Of couse, that's just my opinion.06.10.2014 at 12:00 pm3view 21 more commentsJohn Harris I haven't seen your property. I do know all the Florida weeds but, unless your06.10.2014 at 01:04 pmJohn Harris talking about two acres or more- I'd hand pull. save the cash for new whatevers- transportation. Just depends a mature weed is like Oct. you'd use the equipment in the month of Oct. right? for a few hours and then you'd be finished for the year....06.10.2014 at 01:06 pm2Michael Adler The orchard area is maybe 1/10 acre. We also have the area around the nursery to maintain and our annual gardens. The orchard is not the sort of area that is kept weed-free. It will have a ground cover that needs mowing, but won't likely be able to fit a mower between things. I did hand-pull a little this year, around some of the plants, but it wasn't enough. It's got 7' tall bidens and sickle-pod and everything is swarming with morning glory and clematis vines. We've got some laurel cherry I'm trying to kill off too. At least I did pull out all the ragweeds. We could hand-pull the tall stuff if we could find anyone who wants to get covered in bidens seeds in the sun every week when it's 100 degrees out. Actually, if we had someone willing to do that, we've got other things I'd prefer them work on. I was just trying to cut some of the morning glories off some crop plants last Sunday and it didn't go well. We need to just keep it mowed so it doesn't get like that.06.10.2014 at 06:18 pm2Michael Adler I do sort of wish I had more work for these tools in order to justify them, at the same time not really wanting more work.06.10.2014 at 06:28 pm1Michael Adler Susan, are you using the adjustable angle hedge trimmer or the power scythe?06.10.2014 at 06:41 pmMichael Adler It seems silly to get such nice expensive tools for such a small amount of work, but on the other hand, the work needs to get done, and without the tools, I cannot envision it getting done. Perhaps once we have the tools, we'll find more things to use them for, but then, I thought the same thing about my chainsaw, and it mostly sits in the shed. I'm still glad I have the chainsaw for the few times I need it. At least we'll need to use this one every week or two during the summer, though I'm still not sure we actually will. Then the capacity to take down larger diameter and woody things will come in handy.06.10.2014 at 06:44 pmCoral Mac Donald I believe I have a ph number of a lady who has one for sale...message me if you are interested in a Scythe... ;)06.10.2014 at 07:28 pmMichael Adler meh. I already bought one and it needs a new handle and a lot of work on the blade. It's also not useful in tight spaces.06.10.2014 at 07:29 pmCoral Mac Donald K...Yeah..my hands are MONSTER from this issue ,as I deal with it in several yards. I FOOLY understand ... Turn the music up & slow cook some chili~06.10.2014 at 07:31 pmRobert Karl Hutchinson To keep these small engines running, you have to use ethanol-free gas (available from a handful of vendors locally) and you must run the carburetor dry at the end of each work day and empty the tank if it will sit more than a month. Every time I don't do this on my Stihl saws, trimmers, etc., they become unreliable at starting/running.06.10.2014 at 07:54 pm1Song Weaver goats are cheap! :)06.10.2014 at 08:01 pmPaul Best Actually goats are kinda pricey right now. Wish they weren't I could use a herd. Plus they need to be wormed all the damned time.06.10.2014 at 08:06 pmMichael Adler goats cannot be instructed on what to eat and what not to.06.10.2014 at 08:07 pm2Coral Mac Donald For the price of a goat... in Alachua Not unapproachable...The keep could prove to be taxing.06.10.2014 at 08:57 pmCoral Mac Donald http://gainesville.craigslist.org/search/sss?query=goats&sort=rel06.10.2014 at 08:57 pmAnnette Gilley Having seen the orchard tangle, I would say go for the good tool to tackle it. It will save you SO much time every year on that area alone, but you will probably find other uses for it as well.06.10.2014 at 10:19 pm2Faith Carr Here's a thought - might raise some moola for EPP too. Maybe offer it's use (with you to operate) for those of us needing that sort of work but in an even smaller way... The Tool Library idea has been kicked up again...07.10.2014 at 07:47 amFaith Carr Is this the main unit you're talking about?:http://www.stihlusa.com/products/multi-task-tools/homeowner-kombisystem/ WITH THIS ATTACHMENT? http://www.stihlusa.com/products/multi-task-tools/accessories/kombisystem-attachments/fhpower/07.10.2014 at 07:50 amMichael Adler yes, that's it. About lending... I don't trust anyone else to use them correctly properly. This isn't a shovel. I'm always seeing people abusing chainsaws, so I don't think I'm going to be lending this to anyone.07.10.2014 at 11:44 pm2Faith Carr Hence the reason a tool lending library ain't gonna happen. I agree with you. Heck I break my own stuff often enough08.10.2014 at 08:37 amDeborah Aldridge I feel like it would be a good investment, since it can use several different attachments for other uses. As the orchard grows, you will surely need the pole saw attachment and the string trimmer may actually keep the weeds from getting out of hand.12.10.2014 at 06:52 am
Maria Minno Saturday is the Earthskills sharefest at The Brew Spot, where there will be workshops on permaculture, edible plants, fermentation, home remedies, historicalSee More handicrafts, and more, plus local bands and performances in the evening.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1491739207746075/?ref=br_tf#See Less
Attachment UnavailableThis attachment may have been removed or the person who shared it may not have permission to share it with you.
09.10.2014 at 05:02 pm
Joni Ellis We are having a house concert on Friday at 6 pm with a light dinner and then amazing music by Moors and McCumber from Colorado & Wisconsin. We traveledSee More to Ireland with them recently. Please consider attending, we will have First Magnitude beer, no GMO grain! $20 or best donation you can make. I need folks to show up for this. I want to support this band. Thanks ~ JoniSee Less08.10.2014 at 03:26 pm
Maria Minno This is a description for the food procurement position for the Florida Earthskills Gathering. Please share, and contact Willy TheLosen or Wren if youSee More are interested in the position.

On Friday, October 3, 2014 3:03 PM, Terisa Shoumate (terisa.shoumate@gmail.com) wrote:

Hi, please consider sending this job description to those you know in the Gainesville area who are well connected with local farms (perhaps connected to Farmers Market?) and have an interest in supporting the Florida Earthskills Gathering. Thank you!

Warm Regards,
Wren

Food Purchase and Donation Procurement:
This role begins immediately. Set up orders from farms in advance so they have time to grow the items we would like, raise pigs, etc. Procure donations (research tax deduction possibility) and discounts/best cost for quality produce, from local farmers. Explore possibility of produce from farms in warmer regions of Florida (Tampa area). Also ask local stores/ supermarkets for donations, take notes about donation requirements for next year (Stores may need certain forms or to know in advance). Create a Google doc with info from all potential donors including contact info, contact person’s name, and requirements such as deadlines, etc. Keep detailed notes on how the process unfolds with each potential donor. Take requests from Head Cook/ Kitchen Manager for food items and see that they are procured, and brought to the site pre-event or during event as needed. Compensation $300, free admission and 2 free guests to the 2015 gathering. Must have reliable transportation that can accommodate large coolers and boxes of produce.
--> For more information, please contact Wren at terisa (dot) shoumate (at) gmail (dot) com or Willy at wthelosen (at) yahoo (dot) comSee Less
08.10.2014 at 07:58 am

Moringa


The Moringa oleifera (Drumstick or Horseradish Tree) is a beautiful, fast growing tree (up to 15 feet in a year) with a shady, leaf canopy of very attractive ferny foliage. Small, waxy, creamy-white flowers, resembling miniature orchids, form in clusters, followed by 8-12 inches long round pods that look like drumsticks, hence one of the plant’s common names. The shell of the pod contains a row of neatly packed, wing-edged, round, brown seeds. Mature Moringa trees flower year round, providing lots of nectar for honey bees and a continuous supply of drumsticks for the kitchen. Moringa trees grow extensively in tropical, sub-tropical and warm temperature areas, including Africa, India, South East Asia where it said to grow in the sandiest, driest, most godforsaken places on earth – it is even tolerant of drought, salt and neglect! Moringa has a wondrous array of uses with virtually every part of the tree useful in the kitchen, as medicine or for industry.

Planting:
Plant young trees in well-drained soil in a sunny, frost-free position. They need to be protected from strong winds and frost especially when young. Once trees have had 1-2 winters in colder climates, they do adapt, but may go dormant in winter. In Gainesville, Moringas will freeze in the winter and resprout from the stump in the spring. Protect the base of the tree from frost to ensure resprouting. Stop apical dominance to keep tree short.
Fertilization
: The soils of arid regions (to which moringas are adapted) are typically less weathered and therefore contain more of the soluble minerals that plants need, than the soils of humid regions. To get all that potassium, iron, and calcium from moringa leaves, the soil must have those minerals for the tree to extract (lots more potassium and calcium than Iron). For protein, they need fixed nitrogen and a bit of sulfur. For other processes they need magnesium, phosphorous, and tiny amounts of “micronutrients“. Magnesium deficiency is common in North Fl soils.
Pruning: Young trees should be trimmed and pruned regularly otherwise they can grow 30-50 feet tall. The trunk and branches can be used as living stakes for climbing vegetables. A row of trees can be planted close together to create a living fence.
Propagation: By seed or cuttings.
Nutrition: The leaves are 38% protein with all essential amino acids. They contain 2 x the protein of milk/yoghurt (the highest protein ratio of any plant on earth), and 4 x the calcium of milk, 3 x the potassium of bananas, 4 x the vitamin A of carrots, 7 x the vitamin C of oranges and 3 x the iron of red meat. They contain omega 3, 6 and 9 fatty acids as well as antioxidants and phytonutrients. Moringa leaves are an excellent source of nutrition and a natural energy booster that is not based on sugar, and so it is sustained. Some consider Moringa protein better than soy as it is non-allergic. Moringa contains 18 of the 20 amino acids required by the human body including all eight of the essential amino acids found in meat products.Medicinal uses: A folk remedy for stomach complaints, catarrh, hay fever, impotence, edema, cramps, hemorrhoids, headaches, sore gums; to strengthen the eyes and the brain, liver, gall, digestive, respiratory and immune system, as a blood cleanser and blood builder, and for cancer treatment. Moringa (Ben) oil is used for earache and in ointments for skin conditions. The oil rubbed on the skin is said to prevent mosquitoes from biting. Flowers infused in honey are used as a cough remedy.
Other uses: Moringa oil is the most stable oil in nature (it does not go rancid) and it is used in perfumery, lubricating watches and fine machinery. Ground Moringa seeds are used for water purification.

Culinary Uses:
The leaves can be cooked in any recipe that calls for spinach. The leaflets can be pulled off stalks and boiled as any green or added to soups or rice. Tender growing tips can be cooked stem and all or they can be dried and powdered and sprinkled into soups and stews.The flowers are edible and can be sprinkled on salads: they taste deliciously sweet at first then a spicy/horseradishy finish! The young drumsticks can be cooked like asparagus – they taste like peas with a mild mustard taste. Sliced, young green pods can be used in savory and meat dishes. The young (green) seeds can be cooked and eaten like peas. Mature seeds can be fried or roasted and taste like peanuts or pressed for an oil that is healthier than olive oil. Seeds can be sprouted like wheat grass and eaten as tender nutritious greens. Roots of young seedlings taste like horseradish, and are often grated and used as a substitute.

Moringa Recipes courtesy of www.echonet.org
More information about the Moringa tree from Trees for Life and Echo

800px-moringa_flower_5moringaleaves2moringa2

 












More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search/?q=Moringa%20oleifera
EPP Moringa info sheet (pdf)

1 comment to Moringa

  • Art

    You make me excited with this great information! I always thought India was best known for the Engineers and Gurus. LOL. Anyhow, living in Florida is great. We pretty much eat a starch, fruit and vegetable based selection of food. I use lentils and nuts and seeds sparingly. Greens and starches go well together. I will find a source for the trees and do the grow thing. Thanks very much. Art

Leave a Reply

Or

  

  

  

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>