Michael Adler So the forecasting for the last cold front was terrible. Tuesday night's low was dropping all week until it hit 24 that night, but the actual temp didn'tSee More get below 30. Wednesday's forecast was also dropping all week from not near freezing down to 28 that night, and it actually got below 20 degrees (at Siembra). I was not expecting that. Usually for the first cold snap, the freezing of all the tender vegetation protects what's underneath. I didn't mulch our chayotes and I'm not sure they're coming back. Everything froze solid all the way through, if it wasn't cold-hardy or in the greenhouse. Our outdoor thermometer said we got to 25.See Less24.11.2014 at 09:21 pm
Craig Hepworth Yeah, all day on Tuesday I kept thinking it didn't seem like it was going to get as cold as they were predicting, based on current temp and dewpoint. Likewise all day on Wednesday, it never warmed up, and felt like one of those days that's going to turn into a hard freeze overnight. I'm really curious how they can mess up a forecast that badly.24.11.2014 at 09:33 pmRebekah Starr Whipple yeah, I had things covered, but if I had known it was going to be like that, I would have done more.24.11.2014 at 11:53 pmview 1 more commentsFaith Carr Then again with the rain prediction. Is there a weather smartypants? Not smartass.25.11.2014 at 02:23 am
Michael Adler
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24.11.2014 at 10:57 pm
Michael Adler Let's have a chayote festival! We'll get together and bring/cook lots of chayote themed recipes, and eat them and celebrate the abundance. Who's in?See More Who can host? EPP can supply the chayotes.See Less16.11.2014 at 09:37 pm
Karen Epple Can we do it as part of the Earthskills event on 12/7? One issue how the pick-up of the chayotes could be coordinated beforehand? I know the chayotes have a finite shelf life. I hate to see them go to waste. I assume you may give some to the food banks or St Francis House. I understand Woody Blue is coordinating the food for that event.22.11.2014 at 06:05 pmJoni Ellis NO, that day is full of activities and I do not to add more chaos to the activities already planned. There is a food procurement committee that is coordinating all the food donations. Woody is involved, so is Sarah, Gabrieala, PJ, Joe, and several others. There are spreadsheets to keep track of who is donating what. Keep the chayote fest separate please. they don't need processing for the gathering, they will keep just as they are.23.11.2014 at 07:39 am1view 5 more commentsJoni Ellis In addition, EPP is on the schedule for the Dec 7th event to have an open house like education session. I expect people will want to walk around and ask questions about edible plants, and make purchases of plants. I do not want to take away from that. Sorry if I sounded a bit kurt in the message above, I just don't others reorganizing the festival we already put so much time into organizing. I do appreciate the interest in helping. Michael will need help on Dec 7th to talk to folks and make sales. Please do volunteer on that day.23.11.2014 at 07:45 am3Karen Epple Cool, it will be interesting to see what all the creative cooks will prepare with them!23.11.2014 at 02:45 pmKaren Epple Didn't mean to cause a distraction. My enthnthusiasm can get ahead of me, sometimes Looking forward to the whole day!.23.11.2014 at 02:48 pmJoni Ellis Yeah and I didn't mean to squash creativity, I just had a moment of panic with one more thing going on. Keep the ideas coming Karen!24.11.2014 at 10:30 pmMichael Adler We still need to decide on a date. Ellen Cunningham has offered her house as a location.24.11.2014 at 10:55 pm
Joni Ellis I need volunteers to help move the planters in the front of the Co-op ASAP. The city is going to install nice bike racks and benches early December. WhoSee More can help and when? Please call me 352-262-7300 or text me with your ability to help. Thanks a bunch.See Less20.11.2014 at 06:03 pm
Michael Adler Can anyone help move plants into the greenhouse tomorrow afternoon and back out the next day or two? I just thought of lots of things that aren't quiteSee More dormant yet, and might not like a freeze this hard this early.See Less18.11.2014 at 12:18 am
Michael Adler You can take home chayotes and Pigeon peas18.11.2014 at 12:25 amEllen Cunningham Possibly Thursday afternoon. Give me a call if you're still at it.18.11.2014 at 10:18 pmview 3 more commentsMichael Adler thanks Ellen! can you come by after work? I'm not sure when we"ll finish up but maybe 4:30 or 5:30?19.11.2014 at 08:50 pmEllen Cunningham I should be there by 2:30 ish -19.11.2014 at 10:02 pmMichael Adler I probably won't be able to join you that early. Do you mean you'll be available? I'll try to call20.11.2014 at 12:12 am
Michael Adler request for interviewees:

So EPP grows a lot of plants that are popular in various places around the world that are not here. We try to promote useful
See More edible plants that grow well here, and need promotion because many people around here are not familiar with them. Sometimes we meet people from places where our plants are popular, and they're often very happy to become re-acquainted with them. We are looking for such people for interviews for a story on WUFT.

I've been talking with Maleeha with WUFT. She wants to do a story on EPP, and wants to do it from the angle I just described. If this sounds like you, please call or email Maleeha at 850-319-3278 and maleeha.babar@gmail.comSee Less
13.10.2014 at 08:45 pm
Noelle S. Ward I'm in!!!!!13.10.2014 at 09:10 pmMichael Adler cool. Which plants connect you with your cultural traditions?13.10.2014 at 09:26 pmview 8 more commentsNoelle S. Ward Well being a whitebread Florida girl with a heart in the islands, I would say finding sorrel and learning how to grow it and use it and lemongrass for my love of many uses. My cultural traditions probably would not fit into this story but I'm a big fan of EPP!13.10.2014 at 09:40 pm1Lara MacGibbon We appreciate the unique selection EPP offers. My partner, (farm hand at Frog Song) is from Dominica in the Carribean. He has a strong connection to sorrel and caliloo.. plus many others.13.10.2014 at 10:53 pm1Michael Adler Is he interested in contacting the reporter?13.10.2014 at 11:06 pm1Lara MacGibbon Yes, I forwarded her information to him.13.10.2014 at 11:43 pmEdulis Exsto By when? If she wants a good story, it should have notice. This is the first I heard.
Eing and Sam? Maybe also Veronica?14.10.2014 at 01:26 pm
Maleeha Babar Hi Lara - I sent you an email a while ago. I don't think you received it due it going into the 'other' folder. Would you be interested in doing an interview via phone or email tonight?19.11.2014 at 03:40 pm1Maleeha Babar Could you give me a call tonight or whenever you're free?19.11.2014 at 06:34 pmMiranda Castro love to - we'll be available middle of next week if that's not too late19.11.2014 at 06:58 pm

Maypop


The Maypop Passion Fruit (passiflora incarnata) is a native vine that inhabits sunny areas in all local soil types. It spreads underground and may appear where you had not planned for it to be. It emerges from underground in the spring and flowers with large ornate purple blossoms. The vines grow and produce better in some spots than in others. The difference may be soil quality or drainage.

P. incarnata is the host plant for the gulf fritillary butterfly. Their larvae may completely consume young, potted, or otherwise slow growing plants. Most wild vines grow quickly enough to compensate for the caterpillars.

The delicious fruits begin to mature in late July. Trellising will improve your ability to find the fruits, which fall off when ripe.

The passionflower is nature’s most beautiful – here are some more really fabulous photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/yodaddy/815160262/ To eat, tear open the skin, suck out the innards and chew it all up. The taste is uniquely delicious and the seeds crunchy. You can cut them in half and scoop the pulp out into a fresh fruit salad.
passion1maypop22 maypop3














More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search?sort=relevance&text=maypop%20passion%20fruit

pdf – Maypop Passion Fruit Information Sheet (to print out)

23 comments to Maypop

  • MANON

    IF YOU WANT SOME FAST GROWING VINE WITH BEAUTIFUL COLORED FLOWERS TO COVER AN UGLY FENCE OR WALL….WELL THE MAYPOP WILL SURPRISE YOU AND BEFORE YOU KNOW YOU LOVE THAT “TAKING OVER” VINE.

  • luther

    I ate these maypop’s when I was a little boy growing up in the Carolina’s. Would love to get some seed to try and grow here in Texas.

  • Luther,
    I have many of them growing wild in my yard. Will be happy to share. Contact me through my website.

  • Steve

    They sure bring back memories of my childhood. We used to eat ‘em, stomp ‘em to hear them pop and loved to mash up the insides in water and add just a little sugar. Maypops are the essence of summer. A big wild vine full of maypops is one of ten years old most exciting summer discoveries.
    Minus a snake or an occasional wasp nest!

  • Maria

    They are a fast grower. I picked up a fruit and planted the whole in my yard…now they are taking over…they are nice plants.

  • Cat

    can anyone tell me how to make jelly of them,what do they look like ripe. Please email me if you can help. Cat

  • Cat

    Are these ok to use for herbal purpose? Like the purple passion flower????? Thank you Cat

  • ChayaMan

    In Brasil, we use these fruits to make juice – Maracuja. Mixed up light with sugar, it is a refreshing drink in hot weather. Mixed up thicker, it is a good remedy for insomnia; it puts one to sleep easily without making problems for awaking.

  • kim0307b

    eat the fruit of incarnata?

  • Nessa

    where can I get seeds for this flower?

  • Josie

    I live in the UK and I have one of these growing in my garden. It’s a complete mystery how it got there but the flowers are beautiful!

  • angel brown

    I want so so much to be able to eat-taste them again. I remeber them as a child looking for these wrinkle ,swiveled up yellowish, greenish things that us southern always knew as Maypops which now in my forties no one had no clue what I was saying cause for the first time I realized they where actually called passion fruit (boy did I really felt like a true Hillbilly!!! Where can I get I buy them in Tampa, FL area? I miss the memories! If I can’t buy them,, can Someone tell me how to grow them?? But if U have any I can buy,,please let me kno

  • Beverly Orio

    The leaves also make a very nice tea. And the tea is very good for insomnia, and safe even for babies. Many other medicinal benefits to the leaf.

  • Stephen

    Does anyone still have the seeds avalable?

  • Rachel

    I live in Northwest indiana. I had a maypop passion flower last year. I’m looking at replacing the one since it’s not regrowing this year. Any ideas of where to find would be very helpful. Tha ks in advance.

  • i’m so sorry we do not have maypop seeds for sale – they are available and i found some here! http://www.sandmountainherbs.com/passion_flower_american_maypop.html

  • Martin

    I moved to Georgia in late June. I noticed this vine by my barn and was concerned it might be toxic to my animals. I was very happy to find out it was a Maypop and am now enjoying the fruits. They vine is now appearing in numerous locations in the yard. I am going to try and save some seeds

  • Jennifer

    I am confused about a previous comment. Someone wrote it is fine to use “leaves” to make tea. Are the “leaves” the flower petals, or actual leaves from the plant?

  • the leaves are the actual leaves jennifer! not the flower petals

  • Mary

    When are the Maypops ripe to eat. My neighbors in Alabama all say that they ore poisonous? Or that they should be eaten a certain time of the year.

  • mark

    I had one of these randomly pop up last year beside my garage on the side that’s sunny in the morning but shaded in the evening. A little later in the season I noticed a small one had popped up near the corner where sun is in the evening. I never really knew what they where. I’ve lived in N.C. all my life and have never even heard of them. I noticed the flowers one day and fell in love. They’re so beautiful and unique looking. I pretty much left them laying on the ground and it done pretty well. But this year the one on the shady side never appeared but the one on the sunny side came right out from under the concrete near my garage door out of ole hard, red clay dirt. It kept getting bigger and bigger trying to go into my garage so I decided to bend it towards a trellis. It has since gotten taller than me and has taken over the trellis and heading back to the ground. It is full of huge beautiful flowers and fruit. I’m just now researching them, their benefits and how to eat them. My landlord told me that they where an aphrodisiac.. Any truth to this?

  • so say the herbalists mark – and researchers found that mounting behaviors in male mice increased significantly when passionflower extracts were administered: http://bit.ly/maypopinfo and http://bit.ly/maypopinfo2

  • when the fruits ripen will vary depending on which gardening zone you are in – check out this website for details and pics of ripe maypops
    green dean says they are categorically not poisonous – “websites have been proliferating the nonsense that Passiflora incarnata has cyanide in it. It categorically does not. The American Pharmaceutical Association Practical Guide to Natural Medicines by Andrea Peirce states: “Unlike other Passiflora species, … [the] Passionflower does not contain the poison cyanide, as some sources incorrectly suggest; they may have mistaken Passiflora incarnata for Passiflora caerulea, the ornamental blue passionflower that does contain this toxin.”
    http://www.eattheweeds.com/maypops-food-fun-medicine-2/

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