Gabriela Waschewsky Here's the invitation to the November Earthskills benefit party. DIY water catchment, fermentation demo, trade blanket, more skills sharing... Bring yourSee More instruments and join the jam!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1005311926153022/?ref_newsfeed_story_type=regularSee Less
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21.10.2014 at 06:59 am
Michael Adler request for interviewees:

So EPP grows a lot of plants that are popular in various places around the world that are not here. We try to promote useful
See More edible plants that grow well here, and need promotion because many people around here are not familiar with them. Sometimes we meet people from places where our plants are popular, and they're often very happy to become re-acquainted with them. We are looking for such people for interviews for a story on WUFT.

I've been talking with Maleeha with WUFT. She wants to do a story on EPP, and wants to do it from the angle I just described. If this sounds like you, please call or email Maleeha at 850-319-3278 and maleeha.babar@gmail.comSee Less
13.10.2014 at 08:45 pm
Noelle S. Ward I'm in!!!!!13.10.2014 at 09:10 pmMichael Adler cool. Which plants connect you with your cultural traditions?13.10.2014 at 09:26 pmview 5 more commentsNoelle S. Ward Well being a whitebread Florida girl with a heart in the islands, I would say finding sorrel and learning how to grow it and use it and lemongrass for my love of many uses. My cultural traditions probably would not fit into this story but I'm a big fan of EPP!13.10.2014 at 09:40 pm1Lara MacGibbon We appreciate the unique selection EPP offers. My partner, (farm hand at Frog Song) is from Dominica in the Carribean. He has a strong connection to sorrel and caliloo.. plus many others.13.10.2014 at 10:53 pm1Michael Adler Is he interested in contacting the reporter?13.10.2014 at 11:06 pm1Lara MacGibbon Yes, I forwarded her information to him.13.10.2014 at 11:43 pmEdulis Exsto By when? If she wants a good story, it should have notice. This is the first I heard.
Eing and Sam? Maybe also Veronica?14.10.2014 at 01:26 pm
Michael Adler I'm interested in an expensive tool to maintain our orchard. it's currently growing 7' tall weeds, bidens and other things. Once we get more trees inSee More there, it will be more complicated to keep under control, and we've completely failed at it this year. What I think would be the best tool for it is something Stihl calls a "power scythe." It's like a short hedge-trimmer at the end of a weed-whacker-like machine. It's part of their "kombi system", where the engine and attachments are sold separately, so that one engine can operate many kinds of tools. I'm also interested in their pole chainsaw and maybe a string trimmer would be nice. You can also get a small rototiller attachment. To get just the motor and power-scythe attachment is going to be $600. Other brands sell similar tools for cheaper, but I know Stihl makes quality products, and I'm suspicious about the cheap ones. What do you think? Is this a worthwhile investment for us? EPP has plenty of cash right now.See Less05.10.2014 at 10:15 pm
Craig Hepworth How big is the area that needs to be maintained?06.10.2014 at 09:12 amFaith Carr Yes. No qualifiers. Good professional equipment is always worth the extra cost when there is years worth of work ahead. A trial crop or first timer stuff? No. You've been at this long enough to have 'earned' the right to quality tools that will promote quality product. Of couse, that's just my opinion.06.10.2014 at 12:00 pm3view 21 more commentsJohn Harris I haven't seen your property. I do know all the Florida weeds but, unless your06.10.2014 at 01:04 pmJohn Harris talking about two acres or more- I'd hand pull. save the cash for new whatevers- transportation. Just depends a mature weed is like Oct. you'd use the equipment in the month of Oct. right? for a few hours and then you'd be finished for the year....06.10.2014 at 01:06 pm2Michael Adler The orchard area is maybe 1/10 acre. We also have the area around the nursery to maintain and our annual gardens. The orchard is not the sort of area that is kept weed-free. It will have a ground cover that needs mowing, but won't likely be able to fit a mower between things. I did hand-pull a little this year, around some of the plants, but it wasn't enough. It's got 7' tall bidens and sickle-pod and everything is swarming with morning glory and clematis vines. We've got some laurel cherry I'm trying to kill off too. At least I did pull out all the ragweeds. We could hand-pull the tall stuff if we could find anyone who wants to get covered in bidens seeds in the sun every week when it's 100 degrees out. Actually, if we had someone willing to do that, we've got other things I'd prefer them work on. I was just trying to cut some of the morning glories off some crop plants last Sunday and it didn't go well. We need to just keep it mowed so it doesn't get like that.06.10.2014 at 06:18 pm2Michael Adler I do sort of wish I had more work for these tools in order to justify them, at the same time not really wanting more work.06.10.2014 at 06:28 pm1Michael Adler Susan, are you using the adjustable angle hedge trimmer or the power scythe?06.10.2014 at 06:41 pmMichael Adler It seems silly to get such nice expensive tools for such a small amount of work, but on the other hand, the work needs to get done, and without the tools, I cannot envision it getting done. Perhaps once we have the tools, we'll find more things to use them for, but then, I thought the same thing about my chainsaw, and it mostly sits in the shed. I'm still glad I have the chainsaw for the few times I need it. At least we'll need to use this one every week or two during the summer, though I'm still not sure we actually will. Then the capacity to take down larger diameter and woody things will come in handy.06.10.2014 at 06:44 pmCoral Mac Donald I believe I have a ph number of a lady who has one for sale...message me if you are interested in a Scythe... ;)06.10.2014 at 07:28 pmMichael Adler meh. I already bought one and it needs a new handle and a lot of work on the blade. It's also not useful in tight spaces.06.10.2014 at 07:29 pmCoral Mac Donald K...Yeah..my hands are MONSTER from this issue ,as I deal with it in several yards. I FOOLY understand ... Turn the music up & slow cook some chili~06.10.2014 at 07:31 pmRobert Karl Hutchinson To keep these small engines running, you have to use ethanol-free gas (available from a handful of vendors locally) and you must run the carburetor dry at the end of each work day and empty the tank if it will sit more than a month. Every time I don't do this on my Stihl saws, trimmers, etc., they become unreliable at starting/running.06.10.2014 at 07:54 pm1Song Weaver goats are cheap! :)06.10.2014 at 08:01 pmPaul Best Actually goats are kinda pricey right now. Wish they weren't I could use a herd. Plus they need to be wormed all the damned time.06.10.2014 at 08:06 pmMichael Adler goats cannot be instructed on what to eat and what not to.06.10.2014 at 08:07 pm2Coral Mac Donald For the price of a goat... in Alachua Not unapproachable...The keep could prove to be taxing.06.10.2014 at 08:57 pmCoral Mac Donald http://gainesville.craigslist.org/search/sss?query=goats&sort=rel06.10.2014 at 08:57 pmAnnette Gilley Having seen the orchard tangle, I would say go for the good tool to tackle it. It will save you SO much time every year on that area alone, but you will probably find other uses for it as well.06.10.2014 at 10:19 pm2Faith Carr Here's a thought - might raise some moola for EPP too. Maybe offer it's use (with you to operate) for those of us needing that sort of work but in an even smaller way... The Tool Library idea has been kicked up again...07.10.2014 at 07:47 amFaith Carr Is this the main unit you're talking about?:http://www.stihlusa.com/products/multi-task-tools/homeowner-kombisystem/ WITH THIS ATTACHMENT? http://www.stihlusa.com/products/multi-task-tools/accessories/kombisystem-attachments/fhpower/07.10.2014 at 07:50 amMichael Adler yes, that's it. About lending... I don't trust anyone else to use them correctly properly. This isn't a shovel. I'm always seeing people abusing chainsaws, so I don't think I'm going to be lending this to anyone.07.10.2014 at 11:44 pm2Faith Carr Hence the reason a tool lending library ain't gonna happen. I agree with you. Heck I break my own stuff often enough08.10.2014 at 08:37 amDeborah Aldridge I feel like it would be a good investment, since it can use several different attachments for other uses. As the orchard grows, you will surely need the pole saw attachment and the string trimmer may actually keep the weeds from getting out of hand.12.10.2014 at 06:52 am
Maria Minno Saturday is the Earthskills sharefest at The Brew Spot, where there will be workshops on permaculture, edible plants, fermentation, home remedies, historicalSee More handicrafts, and more, plus local bands and performances in the evening.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1491739207746075/?ref=br_tf#See Less
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09.10.2014 at 05:02 pm
Joni Ellis We are having a house concert on Friday at 6 pm with a light dinner and then amazing music by Moors and McCumber from Colorado & Wisconsin. We traveledSee More to Ireland with them recently. Please consider attending, we will have First Magnitude beer, no GMO grain! $20 or best donation you can make. I need folks to show up for this. I want to support this band. Thanks ~ JoniSee Less08.10.2014 at 03:26 pm
Maria Minno This is a description for the food procurement position for the Florida Earthskills Gathering. Please share, and contact Willy TheLosen or Wren if youSee More are interested in the position.

On Friday, October 3, 2014 3:03 PM, Terisa Shoumate (terisa.shoumate@gmail.com) wrote:

Hi, please consider sending this job description to those you know in the Gainesville area who are well connected with local farms (perhaps connected to Farmers Market?) and have an interest in supporting the Florida Earthskills Gathering. Thank you!

Warm Regards,
Wren

Food Purchase and Donation Procurement:
This role begins immediately. Set up orders from farms in advance so they have time to grow the items we would like, raise pigs, etc. Procure donations (research tax deduction possibility) and discounts/best cost for quality produce, from local farmers. Explore possibility of produce from farms in warmer regions of Florida (Tampa area). Also ask local stores/ supermarkets for donations, take notes about donation requirements for next year (Stores may need certain forms or to know in advance). Create a Google doc with info from all potential donors including contact info, contact person’s name, and requirements such as deadlines, etc. Keep detailed notes on how the process unfolds with each potential donor. Take requests from Head Cook/ Kitchen Manager for food items and see that they are procured, and brought to the site pre-event or during event as needed. Compensation $300, free admission and 2 free guests to the 2015 gathering. Must have reliable transportation that can accommodate large coolers and boxes of produce.
--> For more information, please contact Wren at terisa (dot) shoumate (at) gmail (dot) com or Willy at wthelosen (at) yahoo (dot) comSee Less
08.10.2014 at 07:58 am
Michael Adler I'd like to discontinue a few plants that EPP has been growing. The Chester and Dirkson thornless blackberries have never performed well at the nurserySee More and I don't want to sell people stuff that isn't going to grow fruit. I'd like to give all those plants away to volunteers who want to see if they can get them to work, so we should figure out a way to equitably distribute them to volunteers. Also, we've had the first fruits from our Australian fuzzy raspberries and I decided they're not worth our time to grow. They are also large and aggressive. Some of the berries taste nice, but they are full of the hair-like dried pistils from the flower, and that gives it an unpleasant texture. We have not sold those because we were building up our inventory, but I'd like to stop doing that and sell what we've got.See Less05.10.2014 at 07:52 pm

Cranberry Hibiscus


Cranberry Hibiscus ( (a.k.a False roselle, African rosemallow – Hibiscus acetosella) is a striking and colorful plant with red leaves that resemble a maple leaf. It can be grown as a border or hedge plant – its dramatic purple leaves contrasting nicely with plants that have paler green leaves.

Zones: 8-11 Mature Height/Spread: 4-6 (10) feet
Mature Form: Wild & rangy, a dense bush if well pruned
Growth Rate: Rapid
Sun Exposure: Full Sun
Soil Requirements: 6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)
Soil Type: All kinds of soil as long as it is well-drained
Water: Fairly drought tolerant
Leaves: Burgundy to bronze-green
Flower Color: Pink
Bloom Time: Late Fall/Early Winter
Propagation: Cuttings or seed. Seeds can be dried on plants and collected (wear gloves to protect hands when handling seeds)
Pests/Diseases: It is nematode and insect resistant It does best in full sun to light shade and has rose pink hollyhock-like flowers that open for a few hours at midday mostly in the fall. It tends to grow so tall it straggles all over the place because its slender branches bend right over from the weight of its leaves. Prune it when it is young by pinching out the growing tips to encourage it to form a dense bush. Cut it to the base after it has finished blooming and it will usually grow a second year. If kept well pruned, it makes a lovely hedge or shrub. Hibiscus sabdariffa is a sister species whose calyx (the sepals of the flower) is widely eaten throughout Africa. The calyx of cranberry hibiscus is not fleshy and is not eaten.

In Central America the flowers are blended with ice, sugar, lemon or lime juice and water to make a delicious, purple lemonade. The leaves are pleasantly tart and can be eaten in salads and stir fries. They retain their red color even after cooking. Because the leaves are a bit mucilaginous (slimy), they are best cooked in small-ish quantities and cooked only for a short time.
Hibiscus Drink: Collect about thirty blossoms at dusk after they have folded. The petals add a bright red color rather than any special flavor. Bring 6 cups of water to a boil and remove from heat. Add 4 oz. dried hibiscus flowers and allow to steep, covered. When cool, add sugar to taste, and ½ cup fresh squeezed lime or lemon juice. Serve chilled.

Resources http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/roselle.html#Food%20Uses http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com http://www.hibiscus.org
cranberryhibiscus cranberryhibiscus2 cranberryhibiscus3
















More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search?sort=relevance&text=Hibiscus%20acetosella

pdf – Cranberry Hibiscus Information Sheet (to print out)

9 comments to Cranberry Hibiscus

  • Jay

    Just a note referencing above comments on cranberry hibiscus. It states the plant is nematode and insect resistant. I don’t know about the nematodes, but I have several in my yard that almost became extinct from Thrips, mealy bugs, aphids and Sri Lanka weevil. I added a thick layer of mulch around the plant and the Sri Lanka weevil finally left. Also I drenched plants with neem oil and a spray of 2 tbs dish detergent (non degreaser type) and 2 tbs cooking oil per gallon, and the plants are now clean.

  • It usually grows fine for us. I haven’t had pest problems, but I heard of some that had something that looks like mealy bugs or a wooly aphid.

  • Lori Roche

    We have just discovered this fast growing hibiscus. We have noticed white spots sporadically on the leaves. What would you recommend using to get rid of this insect or fungus, or will it even bother the plant if left alone?

  • Diana

    I have planted a red/purple hibiscus plant and have pruned it back to create a bush. I now have flies I am assuming white flies. the leaves are being eaten away and the the blooms are not opening. I have used the soapy water solution and this is not working. I will try adding some oil to it. Any suggestions would be great as I love making tea with the flowers.

  • Greg Garriss

    I’ve grown roselle here in Hawai’i for several years and found it to be a wonderfully robust plant until recently. At the moment, I am battling a problem that is either bacterial or fungal. I get necrotic spots on the branches that grow until they wrap the circumference. Then the upper portion of the branch dies. The skin of the branch looks almost burned and the inside is rotted out. This takes maybe a week. I asked our local Ag extension to look into it.

  • Steve Grogan

    Diana, for whiteflies, if you spray your infected plants with strong blasts from a hose, once or twice a day for at least three consecutive days, you’ll disrupt the reproductive cycle of whiteflies and they’ll disappear. They deposit their eggs on the undersides of leaves. Strong jets of water will knock the eggs off.

  • karen

    I am looking for some cranberry hibiscus.
    Can anyone share may be 10 seed?
    I am planning to make an edible garden and I think this plant is an outstanding in edible landscapes.
    thanks

  • Dorothy Rideout

    I have a lovely 9 foot tall (so far) cranberry hibiscus flagpole grown from seed. How should it be groomed to be an attractive tree (preferably) or should it be cut way back for a bush? The one this seedling came from was a stand alone that had the main trunk severed and the resulting branches were not attractive, lovely flowers and foliage but unattractive branching. It is very fast growing and does develop sturdy heavy branches that continue rapidly growing straight up. I cut them back to thicken them up but those branches died off so removed the tree. I can’t imagine it as a shrub. I also had to put duct tape around the base of trunk and branches to prevent the rabbits from destroying it. Thanks for the whitefly treatment. Will try that.

  • I have seen that die-back, and I’m not sure what causes it. I’ve also seen them cut or frozen nearly to the ground, and regrow vigorously. If it keeps trying to grow up and won’t get bushy, that sounds like it may not have enough light. We’ve had some get very bushy and take over a quarter of the greenhouse before we cut them way back last year when we needed the space for winter. They never quite recovered. Maybe instead of cutting large branches, keep harvesting the top foot of leafy branch tips every couple weeks. Allow some large branches to develop, that keep growing new shoots for harvest. We had some that fell over, so the sideways branches stayed, but the verticals kept being cut in half. They didn’t seem to mind that, and we could’t seem to harvest enough to keep them from blocking the sprinklers.

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