Miranda Castro an edible mandala! let's make one!
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29.07.2014 at 11:09 pm
Miranda Castro i dropped in at the nursery this afternoon and michael and denise were glad to take a break from the heat - michael cracked open some green coconuts forSee More water and jelly, one of the best mangos ever, some killer guac 'n' chips, and a bowl of figs from denise's garden - yum!See Less27.07.2014 at 09:45 pm
Pam Vetro are the mangos growing here?28.07.2014 at 09:05 amMiranda Castro no Pam - michael brings them from south florida - we can only grown them in a greenhouse up here28.07.2014 at 09:05 amview 1 more commentsPam Vetro too bad! I had hoped that there is a new type that we can grow. Also, avocados. I'd love to grow those.28.07.2014 at 09:07 am
Michael Adler please fill out this form if you have an interest in food forest in Gainesville! We need as many as possible filled out by the 5th!
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1skCAq0RrtKbjEPilA203RiVq5XTNegODIAA2h-t9TXc/viewform
Friends of Reserve Park Comment Form and Questionnairedocs.google.comFriends of Reserve Park is a community support group interested in helping to determine what will happen to the old 8th Ave. US Army Reserve property.
24.07.2014 at 04:25 pm
Faith Carr Done.24.07.2014 at 07:10 pmDeborah Aldridge Done24.07.2014 at 07:54 pm
Michael Adler 24.07.2014 at 04:21 pm
Michael Adler Tim McCarthy is a local artist. EPP hired him to design and print T-shirts for us. Unfortunately, his wife experienced a medical catastrophe that isSee More still ongoing, they lost their house, and the printing machine is in storage. Tim is selling his original art works to raise money. He can often be found at the Downtown farmer's market. If anyone is interested or wants to help, I thought I'd post this. Here are some websites wit his work. http://www.natureart.biz/index.htmlSee Less24.07.2014 at 04:02 am
Michael Adler http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/tim-mccarthy.html24.07.2014 at 04:02 am1Deborah Sullivan Allen I love Tim and his work.! I still wear (constantly) the many shirts I purchased from him well over 10 years ago. Someone was visiting my son the other day. When I got out of my car, the first thing she said was "Oh, that's one of Tim's shirts!" I have 3 of his prints on my walls, as well. He does a beautiful job and everyone should own some Tim McCarthy originals!!!!24.07.2014 at 07:22 am
Michael Adler I might get a load of pine bark Tuesday afternoon, and maybe some coffee grounds too. We're out of both and need them to mix soil. Anyone want to help?22.07.2014 at 01:08 am

Cranberry Hibiscus


Cranberry Hibiscus ( (a.k.a False roselle, African rosemallow – Hibiscus acetosella) is a striking and colorful plant with red leaves that resemble a maple leaf. It can be grown as a border or hedge plant – its dramatic purple leaves contrasting nicely with plants that have paler green leaves.

Zones: 8-11 Mature Height/Spread: 4-6 (10) feet
Mature Form: Wild & rangy, a dense bush if well pruned
Growth Rate: Rapid
Sun Exposure: Full Sun
Soil Requirements: 6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)
Soil Type: All kinds of soil as long as it is well-drained
Water: Fairly drought tolerant
Leaves: Burgundy to bronze-green
Flower Color: Pink
Bloom Time: Late Fall/Early Winter
Propagation: Cuttings or seed. Seeds can be dried on plants and collected (wear gloves to protect hands when handling seeds)
Pests/Diseases: It is nematode and insect resistant It does best in full sun to light shade and has rose pink hollyhock-like flowers that open for a few hours at midday mostly in the fall. It tends to grow so tall it straggles all over the place because its slender branches bend right over from the weight of its leaves. Prune it when it is young by pinching out the growing tips to encourage it to form a dense bush. Cut it to the base after it has finished blooming and it will usually grow a second year. If kept well pruned, it makes a lovely hedge or shrub. Hibiscus sabdariffa is a sister species whose calyx (the sepals of the flower) is widely eaten throughout Africa. The calyx of cranberry hibiscus is not fleshy and is not eaten.

In Central America the flowers are blended with ice, sugar, lemon or lime juice and water to make a delicious, purple lemonade. The leaves are pleasantly tart and can be eaten in salads and stir fries. They retain their red color even after cooking. Because the leaves are a bit mucilaginous (slimy), they are best cooked in small-ish quantities and cooked only for a short time.
Hibiscus Drink: Collect about thirty blossoms at dusk after they have folded. The petals add a bright red color rather than any special flavor. Bring 6 cups of water to a boil and remove from heat. Add 4 oz. dried hibiscus flowers and allow to steep, covered. When cool, add sugar to taste, and ½ cup fresh squeezed lime or lemon juice. Serve chilled.

Resources http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/roselle.html#Food%20Uses http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com http://www.hibiscus.org
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More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search?sort=relevance&text=Hibiscus%20acetosella

pdf – Cranberry Hibiscus Information Sheet (to print out)

7 comments to Cranberry Hibiscus

  • Jay

    Just a note referencing above comments on cranberry hibiscus. It states the plant is nematode and insect resistant. I don’t know about the nematodes, but I have several in my yard that almost became extinct from Thrips, mealy bugs, aphids and Sri Lanka weevil. I added a thick layer of mulch around the plant and the Sri Lanka weevil finally left. Also I drenched plants with neem oil and a spray of 2 tbs dish detergent (non degreaser type) and 2 tbs cooking oil per gallon, and the plants are now clean.

  • It usually grows fine for us. I haven’t had pest problems, but I heard of some that had something that looks like mealy bugs or a wooly aphid.

  • Lori Roche

    We have just discovered this fast growing hibiscus. We have noticed white spots sporadically on the leaves. What would you recommend using to get rid of this insect or fungus, or will it even bother the plant if left alone?

  • Diana

    I have planted a red/purple hibiscus plant and have pruned it back to create a bush. I now have flies I am assuming white flies. the leaves are being eaten away and the the blooms are not opening. I have used the soapy water solution and this is not working. I will try adding some oil to it. Any suggestions would be great as I love making tea with the flowers.

  • Greg Garriss

    I’ve grown roselle here in Hawai’i for several years and found it to be a wonderfully robust plant until recently. At the moment, I am battling a problem that is either bacterial or fungal. I get necrotic spots on the branches that grow until they wrap the circumference. Then the upper portion of the branch dies. The skin of the branch looks almost burned and the inside is rotted out. This takes maybe a week. I asked our local Ag extension to look into it.

  • Steve Grogan

    Diana, for whiteflies, if you spray your infected plants with strong blasts from a hose, once or twice a day for at least three consecutive days, you’ll disrupt the reproductive cycle of whiteflies and they’ll disappear. They deposit their eggs on the undersides of leaves. Strong jets of water will knock the eggs off.

  • karen

    I am looking for some cranberry hibiscus.
    Can anyone share may be 10 seed?
    I am planning to make an edible garden and I think this plant is an outstanding in edible landscapes.
    thanks

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