Joni Ellis I need volunteers to help move the planters in the front of the Co-op ASAP. The city is going to install nice bike racks and benches early December. WhoSee More can help and when? Please call me 352-262-7300 or text me with your ability to help. Thanks a bunch.See Less20.11.2014 at 06:03 pm
Michael Adler Can anyone help move plants into the greenhouse tomorrow afternoon and back out the next day or two? I just thought of lots of things that aren't quiteSee More dormant yet, and might not like a freeze this hard this early.See Less18.11.2014 at 12:18 am
Michael Adler You can take home chayotes and Pigeon peas18.11.2014 at 12:25 amEllen Cunningham Possibly Thursday afternoon. Give me a call if you're still at it.18.11.2014 at 10:18 pmview 3 more commentsMichael Adler thanks Ellen! can you come by after work? I'm not sure when we"ll finish up but maybe 4:30 or 5:30?19.11.2014 at 08:50 pmEllen Cunningham I should be there by 2:30 ish -19.11.2014 at 10:02 pmMichael Adler I probably won't be able to join you that early. Do you mean you'll be available? I'll try to call20.11.2014 at 12:12 am
Michael Adler request for interviewees:

So EPP grows a lot of plants that are popular in various places around the world that are not here. We try to promote useful
See More edible plants that grow well here, and need promotion because many people around here are not familiar with them. Sometimes we meet people from places where our plants are popular, and they're often very happy to become re-acquainted with them. We are looking for such people for interviews for a story on WUFT.

I've been talking with Maleeha with WUFT. She wants to do a story on EPP, and wants to do it from the angle I just described. If this sounds like you, please call or email Maleeha at 850-319-3278 and maleeha.babar@gmail.comSee Less
13.10.2014 at 08:45 pm
Noelle S. Ward I'm in!!!!!13.10.2014 at 09:10 pmMichael Adler cool. Which plants connect you with your cultural traditions?13.10.2014 at 09:26 pmview 8 more commentsNoelle S. Ward Well being a whitebread Florida girl with a heart in the islands, I would say finding sorrel and learning how to grow it and use it and lemongrass for my love of many uses. My cultural traditions probably would not fit into this story but I'm a big fan of EPP!13.10.2014 at 09:40 pm1Lara MacGibbon We appreciate the unique selection EPP offers. My partner, (farm hand at Frog Song) is from Dominica in the Carribean. He has a strong connection to sorrel and caliloo.. plus many others.13.10.2014 at 10:53 pm1Michael Adler Is he interested in contacting the reporter?13.10.2014 at 11:06 pm1Lara MacGibbon Yes, I forwarded her information to him.13.10.2014 at 11:43 pmEdulis Exsto By when? If she wants a good story, it should have notice. This is the first I heard.
Eing and Sam? Maybe also Veronica?14.10.2014 at 01:26 pm
Maleeha Babar Hi Lara - I sent you an email a while ago. I don't think you received it due it going into the 'other' folder. Would you be interested in doing an interview via phone or email tonight?19.11.2014 at 03:40 pm1Maleeha Babar Could you give me a call tonight or whenever you're free?19.11.2014 at 06:34 pmMiranda Castro love to - we'll be available middle of next week if that's not too late19.11.2014 at 06:58 pm
Michael Adler Let's have a chayote festival! We'll get together and bring/cook lots of chayote themed recipes, and eat them and celebrate the abundance. Who's in?See More Who can host? EPP can supply the chayotes.See Less16.11.2014 at 09:37 pm
Karen Epple I missed the plant sale, worked late. Do you have any chayote left? I would love some to eat and some to plant.15.11.2014 at 06:56 pm
Michael Adler lots, want to come by the nursery tomorrow?15.11.2014 at 06:57 pmKaren Epple Probably, I have an anti-fracking meting at 2. When will you be there. I didn't see a work day posted tomorrow.15.11.2014 at 06:59 pmview 7 more commentsMichael Adler should have a volunteer group coming. I might be there as early as 1, but not sure, since the group isn't getting there till 2. Sun goes down around 5:30 lately.15.11.2014 at 07:01 pmKaren Epple The meeting goes until 5, I can come by at 1, if you are there. Can you let me know via FB? Will you be picking them ahead of the freezes Tuesday and Wed? I can pick them up and leave money with Joni, if you want to leave some, or write a check. I could use a dozen.15.11.2014 at 07:06 pmMichael Adler wonderful. I'll try to get there at 1. I will likely try to pick as many as I can reach Tuesday.15.11.2014 at 07:09 pmKaren Epple Okay, I ordered a picker on a pole, but don't have it yet. I hear a Gatorade bottle can be creatively engineered as a picker, too.15.11.2014 at 07:11 pmKaren Epple Thanks.15.11.2014 at 07:11 pmMichael Adler Are you coming?16.11.2014 at 01:20 pmKaren Epple Thanks for the beautiful chayotes.16.11.2014 at 05:55 pm1
Michael Adler That's not coming out in one piece. .. Hey squirrel, I've got one for you.
16.11.2014 at 01:31 pm

Cranberry Hibiscus


Cranberry Hibiscus ( (a.k.a False roselle, African rosemallow – Hibiscus acetosella) is a striking and colorful plant with red leaves that resemble a maple leaf. It can be grown as a border or hedge plant – its dramatic purple leaves contrasting nicely with plants that have paler green leaves.

Zones: 8-11 Mature Height/Spread: 4-6 (10) feet
Mature Form: Wild & rangy, a dense bush if well pruned
Growth Rate: Rapid
Sun Exposure: Full Sun
Soil Requirements: 6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)
Soil Type: All kinds of soil as long as it is well-drained
Water: Fairly drought tolerant
Leaves: Burgundy to bronze-green
Flower Color: Pink
Bloom Time: Late Fall/Early Winter
Propagation: Cuttings or seed. Seeds can be dried on plants and collected (wear gloves to protect hands when handling seeds)
Pests/Diseases: It is nematode and insect resistant It does best in full sun to light shade and has rose pink hollyhock-like flowers that open for a few hours at midday mostly in the fall. It tends to grow so tall it straggles all over the place because its slender branches bend right over from the weight of its leaves. Prune it when it is young by pinching out the growing tips to encourage it to form a dense bush. Cut it to the base after it has finished blooming and it will usually grow a second year. If kept well pruned, it makes a lovely hedge or shrub. Hibiscus sabdariffa is a sister species whose calyx (the sepals of the flower) is widely eaten throughout Africa. The calyx of cranberry hibiscus is not fleshy and is not eaten.

In Central America the flowers are blended with ice, sugar, lemon or lime juice and water to make a delicious, purple lemonade. The leaves are pleasantly tart and can be eaten in salads and stir fries. They retain their red color even after cooking. Because the leaves are a bit mucilaginous (slimy), they are best cooked in small-ish quantities and cooked only for a short time.
Hibiscus Drink: Collect about thirty blossoms at dusk after they have folded. The petals add a bright red color rather than any special flavor. Bring 6 cups of water to a boil and remove from heat. Add 4 oz. dried hibiscus flowers and allow to steep, covered. When cool, add sugar to taste, and ½ cup fresh squeezed lime or lemon juice. Serve chilled.

Resources http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/roselle.html#Food%20Uses http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com http://www.hibiscus.org
cranberryhibiscus cranberryhibiscus2 cranberryhibiscus3
















More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search?sort=relevance&text=Hibiscus%20acetosella

pdf – Cranberry Hibiscus Information Sheet (to print out)

9 comments to Cranberry Hibiscus

  • Jay

    Just a note referencing above comments on cranberry hibiscus. It states the plant is nematode and insect resistant. I don’t know about the nematodes, but I have several in my yard that almost became extinct from Thrips, mealy bugs, aphids and Sri Lanka weevil. I added a thick layer of mulch around the plant and the Sri Lanka weevil finally left. Also I drenched plants with neem oil and a spray of 2 tbs dish detergent (non degreaser type) and 2 tbs cooking oil per gallon, and the plants are now clean.

  • It usually grows fine for us. I haven’t had pest problems, but I heard of some that had something that looks like mealy bugs or a wooly aphid.

  • Lori Roche

    We have just discovered this fast growing hibiscus. We have noticed white spots sporadically on the leaves. What would you recommend using to get rid of this insect or fungus, or will it even bother the plant if left alone?

  • Diana

    I have planted a red/purple hibiscus plant and have pruned it back to create a bush. I now have flies I am assuming white flies. the leaves are being eaten away and the the blooms are not opening. I have used the soapy water solution and this is not working. I will try adding some oil to it. Any suggestions would be great as I love making tea with the flowers.

  • Greg Garriss

    I’ve grown roselle here in Hawai’i for several years and found it to be a wonderfully robust plant until recently. At the moment, I am battling a problem that is either bacterial or fungal. I get necrotic spots on the branches that grow until they wrap the circumference. Then the upper portion of the branch dies. The skin of the branch looks almost burned and the inside is rotted out. This takes maybe a week. I asked our local Ag extension to look into it.

  • Steve Grogan

    Diana, for whiteflies, if you spray your infected plants with strong blasts from a hose, once or twice a day for at least three consecutive days, you’ll disrupt the reproductive cycle of whiteflies and they’ll disappear. They deposit their eggs on the undersides of leaves. Strong jets of water will knock the eggs off.

  • karen

    I am looking for some cranberry hibiscus.
    Can anyone share may be 10 seed?
    I am planning to make an edible garden and I think this plant is an outstanding in edible landscapes.
    thanks

  • Dorothy Rideout

    I have a lovely 9 foot tall (so far) cranberry hibiscus flagpole grown from seed. How should it be groomed to be an attractive tree (preferably) or should it be cut way back for a bush? The one this seedling came from was a stand alone that had the main trunk severed and the resulting branches were not attractive, lovely flowers and foliage but unattractive branching. It is very fast growing and does develop sturdy heavy branches that continue rapidly growing straight up. I cut them back to thicken them up but those branches died off so removed the tree. I can’t imagine it as a shrub. I also had to put duct tape around the base of trunk and branches to prevent the rabbits from destroying it. Thanks for the whitefly treatment. Will try that.

  • I have seen that die-back, and I’m not sure what causes it. I’ve also seen them cut or frozen nearly to the ground, and regrow vigorously. If it keeps trying to grow up and won’t get bushy, that sounds like it may not have enough light. We’ve had some get very bushy and take over a quarter of the greenhouse before we cut them way back last year when we needed the space for winter. They never quite recovered. Maybe instead of cutting large branches, keep harvesting the top foot of leafy branch tips every couple weeks. Allow some large branches to develop, that keep growing new shoots for harvest. We had some that fell over, so the sideways branches stayed, but the verticals kept being cut in half. They didn’t seem to mind that, and we could’t seem to harvest enough to keep them from blocking the sprinklers.

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