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Karen Epple Looking for some great groups, like you folks,, to table at the event. No fee to participate. We'll have a great time and share our vision for a better world. Please join us!
We will have some help to
See More schlep stuff, if you need it.See Less
25.03.2015 at 01:41 amLike
Crystal Hartman Captain's log, plant date 3/22/15:

Great Scott Captain, she can't handle anymore! Unexpected overload of eager volunteers! Any more and she'll blow. I'm a farmer, not a manager! You get the point.

We
See More had 12 students from Alpha Epsilon Delta visit the nursery today and lend many hands to get this place ship shape. Swabbing the deck is arduous work so we took breaks to pot some arrowroot and sunchokes into pots for sale at the Market. There were so many of each we have 2 plots in the gardens and about 40 pots of each for sale. One volunteer took on the massive task of removing all the sprinkler heads for cleaning.

The sun was hot and as the students had their sweaty fill, Nancy and I cleaned up and knocked off early.

However, the work continues at the seed plots...See Less
22.03.2015 at 07:38 pmLike
Crystal Hartman 22.03.2015 at 07:45 pmCrystal Hartman 22.03.2015 at 07:45 pmview 9 more commentsNancy Hendler 22.03.2015 at 09:10 pmNancy Hendler 22.03.2015 at 09:11 pmSteve Blackhawk Barb here: WooooHooo! You GO girl! Many hands make for lighter work! Keep up the good job and delegate delegate !22.03.2015 at 09:16 pm4Michael Adler :-) did you make sure the sprinkled heads are pointed in the right directions?22.03.2015 at 10:21 pm3Susan Marynowski Alright...great work everyone!23.03.2015 at 12:15 am1Gabriela Waschewsky Glad to hear the day went so well.23.03.2015 at 01:08 am1Evelyn Giansanti Reedy Happy to hear you so many volunteers.!23.03.2015 at 01:36 am1Deborah Aldridge You have sunchokes? And you are there this Wednesday? Please LMK. I've been looking for them.23.03.2015 at 11:40 pm1Crystal Hartman Hi Deborah, we just potted some sunchokes for sale. I can meet you there Wednesday (tomorrow) by appointment, or I will be there Thurs 4-6. 352214817924.03.2015 at 06:22 pm
Crystal Hartman GREEN SUNDAY this weekend (March 22) from 12-4. Nancy Hendler and I will be at the helm. Please stop in for an hour or two to help this community project stay active.21.03.2015 at 04:13 pmLike
Crystal Hartman OPEN FOR BUSINESS this Thursday 4-6.
Come if you can to help me catch up on all the stuff that's getting behind.

NEED SOMEONE to cover this Sunday 12-4. There are 5 Sundays this month and there was some
See More confusion. I will be performing with my choir at the Kanapaha Spring Festival and NOT available that day. Saturday I have a class field trip. PM me please!See Less
18.03.2015 at 02:50 pmLike
Edulis Exsto Anyone open to do Saturdays?19.03.2015 at 11:57 pm
Crystal Hartman No Green Sunday March 15.

I could not find someone to cover this Sunday and I am away with my family for the weekend.

Please join us Thursday or next Sunday for our regularly scheduled program.
15.03.2015 at 05:11 amLike
Brian MonkeySoul Stanton Sorry folks, I am also out injured. :(15.03.2015 at 08:21 am
Deborah Aldridge Hi and thanks for accepting me. I have a question about pigeon peas. I got seeds from someone in Brandon, but I don't know the variety. I planted them today, but I'm moving in August, so what are my chancesSee More of getting peas by then? I'm thinking I should just dig most of them back up and put a couple in pots to take with me.See Less11.03.2015 at 12:27 amLike
Michael Adler They won't make peas by August, but if you keep them in pots, they won't do much after August. catch 22. Maybe just try again next year?11.03.2015 at 01:54 amDeborah Aldridge That's what I figured, Michael Adler. I guess I should just give them away, since I doubt I'll be anywhere with a yard next year.12.03.2015 at 05:40 pm

Cranberry Hibiscus


Cranberry Hibiscus ( (a.k.a False roselle, African rosemallow – Hibiscus acetosella) is a striking and colorful plant with red leaves that resemble a maple leaf. It can be grown as a border or hedge plant – its dramatic purple leaves contrasting nicely with plants that have paler green leaves.

Zones: 8-11 Mature Height/Spread: 4-6 (10) feet
Mature Form: Wild & rangy, a dense bush if well pruned
Growth Rate: Rapid
Sun Exposure: Full Sun
Soil Requirements: 6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)
Soil Type: All kinds of soil as long as it is well-drained
Water: Fairly drought tolerant
Leaves: Burgundy to bronze-green
Flower Color: Pink
Bloom Time: Late Fall/Early Winter
Propagation: Cuttings or seed. Seeds can be dried on plants and collected (wear gloves to protect hands when handling seeds)
Pests/Diseases: It is nematode and insect resistant It does best in full sun to light shade and has rose pink hollyhock-like flowers that open for a few hours at midday mostly in the fall. It tends to grow so tall it straggles all over the place because its slender branches bend right over from the weight of its leaves. Prune it when it is young by pinching out the growing tips to encourage it to form a dense bush. Cut it to the base after it has finished blooming and it will usually grow a second year. If kept well pruned, it makes a lovely hedge or shrub. Hibiscus sabdariffa is a sister species whose calyx (the sepals of the flower) is widely eaten throughout Africa. The calyx of cranberry hibiscus is not fleshy and is not eaten.

In Central America the flowers are blended with ice, sugar, lemon or lime juice and water to make a delicious, purple lemonade. The leaves are pleasantly tart and can be eaten in salads and stir fries. They retain their red color even after cooking. Because the leaves are a bit mucilaginous (slimy), they are best cooked in small-ish quantities and cooked only for a short time.
Hibiscus Drink: Collect about thirty blossoms at dusk after they have folded. The petals add a bright red color rather than any special flavor. Bring 6 cups of water to a boil and remove from heat. Add 4 oz. dried hibiscus flowers and allow to steep, covered. When cool, add sugar to taste, and ½ cup fresh squeezed lime or lemon juice. Serve chilled.

Resources http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/roselle.html#Food%20Uses http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com http://www.hibiscus.org
cranberryhibiscus cranberryhibiscus2 cranberryhibiscus3
















More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search?sort=relevance&text=Hibiscus%20acetosella

pdf – Cranberry Hibiscus Information Sheet (to print out)

11 comments to Cranberry Hibiscus

  • Jay

    Just a note referencing above comments on cranberry hibiscus. It states the plant is nematode and insect resistant. I don’t know about the nematodes, but I have several in my yard that almost became extinct from Thrips, mealy bugs, aphids and Sri Lanka weevil. I added a thick layer of mulch around the plant and the Sri Lanka weevil finally left. Also I drenched plants with neem oil and a spray of 2 tbs dish detergent (non degreaser type) and 2 tbs cooking oil per gallon, and the plants are now clean.

  • It usually grows fine for us. I haven’t had pest problems, but I heard of some that had something that looks like mealy bugs or a wooly aphid.

  • Lori Roche

    We have just discovered this fast growing hibiscus. We have noticed white spots sporadically on the leaves. What would you recommend using to get rid of this insect or fungus, or will it even bother the plant if left alone?

  • Diana

    I have planted a red/purple hibiscus plant and have pruned it back to create a bush. I now have flies I am assuming white flies. the leaves are being eaten away and the the blooms are not opening. I have used the soapy water solution and this is not working. I will try adding some oil to it. Any suggestions would be great as I love making tea with the flowers.

  • Greg Garriss

    I’ve grown roselle here in Hawai’i for several years and found it to be a wonderfully robust plant until recently. At the moment, I am battling a problem that is either bacterial or fungal. I get necrotic spots on the branches that grow until they wrap the circumference. Then the upper portion of the branch dies. The skin of the branch looks almost burned and the inside is rotted out. This takes maybe a week. I asked our local Ag extension to look into it.

  • Steve Grogan

    Diana, for whiteflies, if you spray your infected plants with strong blasts from a hose, once or twice a day for at least three consecutive days, you’ll disrupt the reproductive cycle of whiteflies and they’ll disappear. They deposit their eggs on the undersides of leaves. Strong jets of water will knock the eggs off.

  • karen

    I am looking for some cranberry hibiscus.
    Can anyone share may be 10 seed?
    I am planning to make an edible garden and I think this plant is an outstanding in edible landscapes.
    thanks

  • Dorothy Rideout

    I have a lovely 9 foot tall (so far) cranberry hibiscus flagpole grown from seed. How should it be groomed to be an attractive tree (preferably) or should it be cut way back for a bush? The one this seedling came from was a stand alone that had the main trunk severed and the resulting branches were not attractive, lovely flowers and foliage but unattractive branching. It is very fast growing and does develop sturdy heavy branches that continue rapidly growing straight up. I cut them back to thicken them up but those branches died off so removed the tree. I can’t imagine it as a shrub. I also had to put duct tape around the base of trunk and branches to prevent the rabbits from destroying it. Thanks for the whitefly treatment. Will try that.

  • I have seen that die-back, and I’m not sure what causes it. I’ve also seen them cut or frozen nearly to the ground, and regrow vigorously. If it keeps trying to grow up and won’t get bushy, that sounds like it may not have enough light. We’ve had some get very bushy and take over a quarter of the greenhouse before we cut them way back last year when we needed the space for winter. They never quite recovered. Maybe instead of cutting large branches, keep harvesting the top foot of leafy branch tips every couple weeks. Allow some large branches to develop, that keep growing new shoots for harvest. We had some that fell over, so the sideways branches stayed, but the verticals kept being cut in half. They didn’t seem to mind that, and we could’t seem to harvest enough to keep them from blocking the sprinklers.

  • Carole Latino

    I’ve heard of making tea with just the leaves, is that true and how many?

  • i have never made a tea from the leaves carole but i found someone who has done: http://homesteadingthebackforty.blogspot.com/2009/08/false-rosellecranberry-hibiscus-update.html
    “The small tender leaves are very delicious in salads…we really like them! The other larger leaves are my current favorite in hot tea, especially combined with other medicinal tea plants. Right now I make a mix of fresh leaves of the false roselle (cranberry hibiscus), comfrey, moringa, and yerba buena”

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