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Crystal Hartman This Sunday (6-21) come celebrate the solstice with EPP. I will be there from 8 am to 12 pm.

A most excellent breakfast will be provided. Come hungry, bring water.

Use www.edibleplantproject.org/nursery/directions
See More to get there.See Less
18.06.2015 at 09:47 pmLike
Evelyn Giansanti Reedy If I am in town I will try to stop by. You are a fabulous cook! The plan as of today is to be in Cocoa Beach.18.06.2015 at 10:23 pm1Crystal Hartman I like your plan a lot. Go with it!18.06.2015 at 10:24 pm1view 2 more commentsEdulis Exsto Crystal Hartman, we are grateful for your early discipline to help others beat the heat!18.06.2015 at 10:28 pm1Nancy Hendler Crystal, Thank you for starting so early. (Y)19.06.2015 at 12:53 am1
Joni Ellis This is not plant related, however, if you are interested in raising food, this may be of interest. I am harvesting more chickens this friday from 8-noon at Crazy Woman Farm. If anyone is interested inSee More helping and learning a new skill. Just thought I would share. Thanks for all everyone is doing to keep EPP alive. Smiles.See Less17.06.2015 at 08:27 pmLike
Crystal Hartman Thank you to the volunteers who made this past Sunday such a success! We had six volunteers including Norman Biegner, Jamey Sadler, Jojo Gardens, Tad DeGroat, Annette Gilley, and Emily.

So much was accomplished
See More including a LOT of weeding, up-potting, fertilizing and general cleaning.

For those who didn't make it, you missed a fabulous breakfast of my farm eggs, fruit salad of mango, pineapple and strawberries, Ezekiel bread by Norm and grapefruit. Hope to see more of you next Sunday!See Less
15.06.2015 at 02:29 pmLike
Tad DeGroat Birds Nest fungus. common in compost. Crucibulum-5 different varieties.15.06.2015 at 06:20 pm2Crystal Hartman What an odd little fungus. Glad to meet it!15.06.2015 at 06:23 pm1view 1 more commentsTad DeGroat The spheres or eggs are full of spores.15.06.2015 at 06:29 pm1
Edulis Exsto Probing for new board members and committee chair nominations so we can have our election. This is a nonprofit.11.06.2015 at 10:55 pmLike
Marla Barak Sanders ABOUT SARE
SARE is a grant-making and outreach program. Its mission is to advance—to the whole of American agriculture— innovations that improve profitability, stewardship, and quality of life by investing in groundbreaking research and education.
Since it began in 1988, SARE has funded more than 5,000 projects around the nation that explore innovations, from rotational grazing to direct marketing to cover crops—and many other best practices. Administering SARE grants are four regional councils composed of farmers, ranchers, researchers, educators, and other local experts, and coordinators in every state and island protectorate run education programs for ag professionals. SARE Outreach publishes practical books, bulletins, online resources, and other information for farmers and ranchers. All of SARE’s activities are funded by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Guided by the belief that healthy soil is the foundation of healthy agriculture, SARE has made soil quality research and education a cornerstone of its project portfolio—and made Building Soils for Better Crops one of its signature handbooks. This new, all-color edition is an authoritative text on soil health, detailing the latest research and experi- ences of soil scientists—many of whom are SARE grant participants, including the book’s authors. Some other SARE titles that might be of interest to Building Soils readers: (Books) Managing Cover Crops Profitably, third edition; The New American Farmer, second edition; Crop Rotation on Organic Farms; (Bulletins) Diversifying Cropping Systems; Transitioning to Organic Production; and Smart Water Use on Your Farm or Ranch.
For more information about SARE’s grant-making program and information products, visit www.sare.org or con- tact: SARE Outreach, 1122 Patapsco Bldg., University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-6715; info@sare.org; (301) 405-8020.
SARE’s four regional offices and outreach office work to advance sustainable innovations to the whole of American agriculture.14.06.2015 at 01:32 am2
Crystal Hartman Please contact me directly through message or at 352-214-8179 if you are interested in a board position, including officers.15.06.2015 at 02:31 pm1
Crystal Hartman Please share with your friends! This Sunday 9-1
11.06.2015 at 01:06 pmLike

Cherry of the Rio Grande (Eugenia aggregata)


This Cherry Tree (Eugenia aggregata)  grows as a narrow evergreen shrub, 10-20 ft high.
It flowers in the spring and summer. Flowers are followed in three weeks by 1-2" oblong, dark- red/purple fruits that are sweet, have a thin skin and a single seed.
Cherry of the Rio Grande tolerates a wide range of soils, but can show signs of mineral deficiency in calcareous/basic soils, preferring those with a pH in the range of 5.5-6.8.
New plants should be lightly fertilized with a magnesium containing fertilizer that has a 1-1-1 ratio.
Fruit size and quality is largely a function of proper nutrition and irrigation.
Mature plants should be fertilized with an 8-3-9 with 5% MgO. Mineral deficiencies can be corrected with foliar sprays.
Cherry of the Rio Grande is cold hardy to 20 degrees.
Plant in full sun or part shade. It can be container grown.
The plant can survive droughts well, but will fruit poorly during them. Seedlings often take five years to fruit.
The fruit is eaten fresh or made into a jelly or jam.
Cherry of the Rio Grande Cherry of the Rio Grande












More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search?sort=relevance&text=Eugenia%20aggregata

pdf_Cherry of the Rio Grande Information Sheet (to print out)

6 comments to Cherry of the Rio Grande (Eugenia aggregata)

  • Sarah Jumel

    Would anyone care to swap some Eugenia Aggraveta for some other stuff? I’d like to have it, and it has become Eugenia Aggravating for me (I’ve tried raising it from seed various times, no go).
    thanks.
    drasaid@yahoo.com

  • We don’t have any Eugenia aggregata for sale/trade any more. The local crops are consistently lost to late frosts. We got seeds one year, but probably delayed planting too long and they never grew.

  • Kayla

    Do you still have Cherry of the Rio Grande? Does it grow well here, and is it sweet?

    I thought only Barbados Cherry MIGHT grow here in Gainesville. Plus it’s hard to find sweet Barbados Cherry cultivars. Most are described as tart. Florida Sweet is described as semi-sweet. Manoa Sweet is described as sweet, but it’s mostly grown in California. There’s only one Florida supplier, in North Palm Beach, so I don’t know if it would grow here.

  • Dennis J. McNamee

    Pine Island Nursery in Homestead carries the “Florida Sweet”. They have just about EVERY plant found in Central and South America as well as Asia.

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