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Crystal Hartman This Sunday (6-21) come celebrate the solstice with EPP. I will be there from 8 am to 12 pm.

A most excellent breakfast will be provided. Come hungry, bring water.

Use www.edibleplantproject.org/nursery/directions
See More to get there.See Less
18.06.2015 at 09:47 pmLike
Evelyn Giansanti Reedy If I am in town I will try to stop by. You are a fabulous cook! The plan as of today is to be in Cocoa Beach.18.06.2015 at 10:23 pm1Crystal Hartman I like your plan a lot. Go with it!18.06.2015 at 10:24 pm1view 2 more commentsEdulis Exsto Crystal Hartman, we are grateful for your early discipline to help others beat the heat!18.06.2015 at 10:28 pm1Nancy Hendler Crystal, Thank you for starting so early. (Y)19.06.2015 at 12:53 am1
Joni Ellis This is not plant related, however, if you are interested in raising food, this may be of interest. I am harvesting more chickens this friday from 8-noon at Crazy Woman Farm. If anyone is interested inSee More helping and learning a new skill. Just thought I would share. Thanks for all everyone is doing to keep EPP alive. Smiles.See Less17.06.2015 at 08:27 pmLike
Crystal Hartman Thank you to the volunteers who made this past Sunday such a success! We had six volunteers including Norman Biegner, Jamey Sadler, Jojo Gardens, Tad DeGroat, Annette Gilley, and Emily.

So much was accomplished
See More including a LOT of weeding, up-potting, fertilizing and general cleaning.

For those who didn't make it, you missed a fabulous breakfast of my farm eggs, fruit salad of mango, pineapple and strawberries, Ezekiel bread by Norm and grapefruit. Hope to see more of you next Sunday!See Less
15.06.2015 at 02:29 pmLike
Tad DeGroat Birds Nest fungus. common in compost. Crucibulum-5 different varieties.15.06.2015 at 06:20 pm2Crystal Hartman What an odd little fungus. Glad to meet it!15.06.2015 at 06:23 pm1view 1 more commentsTad DeGroat The spheres or eggs are full of spores.15.06.2015 at 06:29 pm1
Edulis Exsto Probing for new board members and committee chair nominations so we can have our election. This is a nonprofit.11.06.2015 at 10:55 pmLike
Marla Barak Sanders ABOUT SARE
SARE is a grant-making and outreach program. Its mission is to advance—to the whole of American agriculture— innovations that improve profitability, stewardship, and quality of life by investing in groundbreaking research and education.
Since it began in 1988, SARE has funded more than 5,000 projects around the nation that explore innovations, from rotational grazing to direct marketing to cover crops—and many other best practices. Administering SARE grants are four regional councils composed of farmers, ranchers, researchers, educators, and other local experts, and coordinators in every state and island protectorate run education programs for ag professionals. SARE Outreach publishes practical books, bulletins, online resources, and other information for farmers and ranchers. All of SARE’s activities are funded by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Guided by the belief that healthy soil is the foundation of healthy agriculture, SARE has made soil quality research and education a cornerstone of its project portfolio—and made Building Soils for Better Crops one of its signature handbooks. This new, all-color edition is an authoritative text on soil health, detailing the latest research and experi- ences of soil scientists—many of whom are SARE grant participants, including the book’s authors. Some other SARE titles that might be of interest to Building Soils readers: (Books) Managing Cover Crops Profitably, third edition; The New American Farmer, second edition; Crop Rotation on Organic Farms; (Bulletins) Diversifying Cropping Systems; Transitioning to Organic Production; and Smart Water Use on Your Farm or Ranch.
For more information about SARE’s grant-making program and information products, visit www.sare.org or con- tact: SARE Outreach, 1122 Patapsco Bldg., University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-6715; info@sare.org; (301) 405-8020.
SARE’s four regional offices and outreach office work to advance sustainable innovations to the whole of American agriculture.14.06.2015 at 01:32 am2
Crystal Hartman Please contact me directly through message or at 352-214-8179 if you are interested in a board position, including officers.15.06.2015 at 02:31 pm1
Crystal Hartman Please share with your friends! This Sunday 9-1
11.06.2015 at 01:06 pmLike

Caribbean Oregano

Caribbean Oregano (Plectranthus amboinicus) may be grown in your vegetable or herb garden or as a potted specimen. The leaves of this succulent herb are fleshy and strongly aromatic. Leaves are often used Caribbean cooking and also as a substitute for sage. The leaves are used medicinally in India as a cure for coughs.

Soil and Water: No special soil requirements are known. Average water needs – do not over water.
Sun: Part sun to shade.
Cold: Will be killed by frost.
Pruning: Pruning will promote branching and can rejuvenate an old lanky plant.
Propagation: Roots easily from cuttings placed in soil.
Pests: None are known.

Harvesting, storage, and preparation: Young leaves have a milder flavor. Using too many leaves could overwhelm the flavor of a dish; when used in moderation the taste pleasant and similar to sage. The flavor is very amenable to beans. The leaves can be used fresh and chopped finely or dried for storage and crumbled. Drying the leaves can take quite a while, especially if they are left attached to the stem.

Caribbean OreganoFlowering Oregano
More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search?sort=relevance&text=Plectranthus%20amboinicus

pdf - Caribbean Oregano Information Sheet(to print out)

2 comments to Caribbean Oregano

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