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Katie Thomas I'm interested in volunteering whenever yall need help. Please keep me posted :)26.07.2015 at 02:48 pmLike
Nancy Hendler Katie Thomas, we will be there this Thursday from 5 - 7 pm, please come join us.29.07.2015 at 09:26 amKatie Thomas Okay thanks!29.07.2015 at 01:05 pm
Annette Gilley Question - Does anyone know if we can grow plantains here in the G'ville area? I don't see them listed for sale at local nurseries or even from Just Fruits.15.07.2015 at 06:45 pmLike
Edulis Exsto The green native plant or the banana like fruit?22.07.2015 at 12:00 pmAnnette Gilley The banana like fruit, for cooking.26.07.2015 at 04:03 amview 2 more commentsAnnette Gilley anybody know? Michael Adler ?28.07.2015 at 05:27 amMichael Adler I wouldn't try. Bananas don't do very well here, don't fruit most years. Plantains are really big bananas and probably take longer to grow than others, so less likely to work.28.07.2015 at 02:10 pm1
Becky Leppard Will you all be having your farmers market sale next month In August? . I would like to send my daughter who lives in Gainesville over to buy some plants for me since I live in Orlando. Thanks27.07.2015 at 05:43 pmLike
Nancy Hendler Becky Leppard, Your daughter can also come to the Greenhouse to purchase plants. There we have a larger selection than what we bring to the Farmer's Market each month.28.07.2015 at 07:52 am
Jd Pierce I've had a lot of trouble fighting this on my kaffir lime tree for quite some time. Spraying it with neem seemed to set the lime tree itself back for a while but perhaps I used too much. It's actuallySee More growing despite this problem, how can I help it?See Less
25.07.2015 at 04:03 pmLike
Annette Gilley Serpentine Leaf Miner. Probably just wait for it to outgrow the damage.26.07.2015 at 04:01 am1
Aunt Maggi Can I use the picture of monarda punctata for the Herb Fest cover photo?24.07.2015 at 07:43 pmLike
Crystal Hartman Of course Aunt Maggi. Thanks for asking!24.07.2015 at 08:02 pmAunt Maggi thank you. :)25.07.2015 at 05:55 pm

Caribbean Oregano

Caribbean Oregano (Plectranthus amboinicus) may be grown in your vegetable or herb garden or as a potted specimen. The leaves of this succulent herb are fleshy and strongly aromatic. Leaves are often used Caribbean cooking and also as a substitute for sage. The leaves are used medicinally in India as a cure for coughs.

Soil and Water: No special soil requirements are known. Average water needs – do not over water.
Sun: Part sun to shade.
Cold: Will be killed by frost.
Pruning: Pruning will promote branching and can rejuvenate an old lanky plant.
Propagation: Roots easily from cuttings placed in soil.
Pests: None are known.

Harvesting, storage, and preparation: Young leaves have a milder flavor. Using too many leaves could overwhelm the flavor of a dish; when used in moderation the taste pleasant and similar to sage. The flavor is very amenable to beans. The leaves can be used fresh and chopped finely or dried for storage and crumbled. Drying the leaves can take quite a while, especially if they are left attached to the stem.

Caribbean OreganoFlowering Oregano
More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search?sort=relevance&text=Plectranthus%20amboinicus

pdf - Caribbean Oregano Information Sheet(to print out)

2 comments to Caribbean Oregano

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