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The topic of propagation Arrowroot came up over on the HPP Event Page (tap Song Weaver), and I though you might be interested in seeing how it's processed after harvest: ... See MoreSee Less

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Faith Carr created an event for Edible Plant Project (.org). ... See MoreSee Less

A Home Propagation Event

January 21, 2017, 11:00am - January 22, 2017, 1:00am

Have ya heard about the Home Propagation Project (HPP)* yet? Are you going to a PROPAGATOR? Then mee...

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Here's a one page overview of the HPP - If you're going to be one of our 'propagators' please print out your copy.

The HOME PROPAGATION PROJECT

The MISSION
To enrich, expand, and develop LOCAL varieties of popular, edible, tasty, climate and soil appropriate perennial food trees and plants that homesteaders/gardeners would like to have in their own backyards.

The Home Propagation Project (HPP), Sponsored by the Edible Plant Project - EPP a 501(c)3
Supported by Grow Gainesville (just a bunch of folks), In cooperation with Forage Farm - a 501(c)3

Do you have some EXCEPTIONAL perennial edible fruits and vegetables in your garden that you would like to SHARE with others?
SIGN UP and help us with the work.
Contact Audra Tyler via e-mail at: audra.b.tyler@gmail.com
Or by phone at: 214-995-0422

PROJECT COORDINATOR: Audra Tyler

PROPAGATION INSTRUCTORS:
Melissa DeSa, Timothy Noyes, Brian Mather, Tad DeGroat (others as needed)

The Edible Plant Project (EPP) will provide the following after approval of each cultivar

One (1) gallon pots and fresh, enriched soil.
Minimum 10 - Maximum 20 (more on approval)
Other supplies as required. (rooting medium, grafting tape, etc)
Instruction/workshop (if required) on the different methods, of plant propagation
Mentoring throughout the propagation process

What is required of the Home Propagator:
Sign up with Name, address, phone, and e-mail
Let us know what YOU would like to propagate, your description and why you think others would like to grow them.

Provide appropriate environment (temp, sun, water, nutrition) during the winter season while your plants grow to transplant/sale size.
Occasional updates on progress: Health & Vigor. Finally, notification of failure if it happens.

Return to the EPP of 80% of the successfully propagated plants when they have sufficient root development for transplanting into the ground.

What We’re Looking for From YOUR Garden
Perennial fruits and vegetables that YOU LOVE and have grown successfully to abundant and healthy production.
Things that are:
Climate appropriate
Soil compatible with a minimum of inputs

EXCLUSIONS
No citrus (we’re not permitted for it). No toxicity. Non Invasive (non-natives are fine)
Anything that requires SPECIAL treatment, i.e. full time greenhouse or extensive customer instruction.
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Faith Carr updated the group photo in Edible Plant Project (.org). ... See MoreSee Less

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Caribbean Oregano

Caribbean Oregano (Plectranthus amboinicus) may be grown in your vegetable or herb garden or as a potted specimen. The leaves of this succulent herb are fleshy and strongly aromatic. Leaves are often used Caribbean cooking and also as a substitute for sage. The leaves are used medicinally in India as a cure for coughs.

Soil and Water: No special soil requirements are known. Average water needs – do not over water.
Sun: Part sun to shade.
Cold: Will be killed by frost.
Pruning: Pruning will promote branching and can rejuvenate an old lanky plant.
Propagation: Roots easily from cuttings placed in soil.
Pests: None are known.

Harvesting, storage, and preparation: Young leaves have a milder flavor. Using too many leaves could overwhelm the flavor of a dish; when used in moderation the taste pleasant and similar to sage. The flavor is very amenable to beans. The leaves can be used fresh and chopped finely or dried for storage and crumbled. Drying the leaves can take quite a while, especially if they are left attached to the stem.

Caribbean OreganoFlowering Oregano
More photos on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/search?sort=relevance&text=Plectranthus%20amboinicus

pdf – Caribbean Oregano Information Sheet(to print out)


4 comments to Caribbean Oregano

  • I used to live in St. Thomas, USVI, and we had the best oregano growing by our home. It was a large, all green, fuzzy leaf. I cant seem to find it to grow here in Florida. Any ideas?

  • you can buy cuban or caribbean oregano in many forms on ebay kathy !

  • Shimrit Hanes

    I found cuban oregano plants at Wards. It has grown well, and is a very beautiful and flavorful plant.

  • I have just recently thinned my Tropical/Cuban/Caribbean Oregano and am drying the leaves. I noticed a post from Kathy and would be glad to share a sprig from what I have remaining but alas, her post was from 2013.
    There is a photo on this site of an oregano with a variegated leaf. So beautiful. Where can I get this?
    Charlie

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