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African Potato Mint
Also known as Kaffir Potato. This mint relative is grown for its potato-like tuber. These tubers can get very large, up to 4 lbs., are very high in protein, carbohydrate, iron and calcium. A so called “lost crop” of Africa that in fact is of immense value today! Thrives in hot and fairly dry conditions. Requires 6 months of warm to hot growing conditions to yield mature tubers.

Three OMRI #Organic plants will be available for drawing at tomorrow's event (will tag event when on computer). Original plant was from Timothy Noyes. Sharing the plant and will keep propagating it for EPP. Laura Halmuth this was the plant I brought for your SEWParty.
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TOMORROW NIGHT - Come on out and check out our NEW Home Propagation Project plants and 'Foster Parents'
Buy some plants - Sweet & Savory Sellabration
April 27th 5:00pm
www.facebook.com/events/1872355519715153/
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2017 Plant Sale & Spring Celebration

April 27, 2017, 5:00pm - April 27, 2017, 7:00pm

Come join us for the official kick off of the 2017 Spring season. Meet our very own Home Propagatio...

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I have an announcement to make--after waiting ALL winter. We finally have some peach seeds that germinated from last year's crop. This is a first! I have gotten everything else to germinate over the years but the peaches. Finally-success! ... See MoreSee Less

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Carolina Madera created an event for Edible Plant Project (.org). ... See MoreSee Less

2nd Wed Edible Plants Farmer's Market

April 12, 2017, 4:00pm - April 12, 2017, 7:00pm

"The EPP is taking the show on the road – As Usual! Jacquilne & Enio will be there from 4:00 unti...

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Faith Carr created an event for Edible Plant Project (.org). ... See MoreSee Less

EPP & Healing Arts

April 29, 2017, 9:00am - April 29, 2017, 12:00pm

The Edible Plant Project presents The EPP Road Show Find Tad DeGroat at the Healing Arts Festival At...

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Callaloo with Tomatoes Recipe

Callaloo (Amaranthus sp.) is a fast-growing spinach relative adapted to a tropical climate. The leaves and young stems are cooked at eaten in a variety of ways. All or nearly all amaranths are edible, both as vegetables and seeds, though some are better suited for one or the other use, and some have better taste and texture than others. The amaranth we are using probably originated in Africa, but we’re not sure. It is called callaloo in Jamaica, but has other names in other areas, and the name “callaloo” refers to a completely different plant in Trinidad.

This dish is best served as a side dish or with bammie and fried plantain or breadfruit for delicious vegetarian breakfast.

INGREDIENTS

4 cups of firmly packed chopped callaloo
1/8 to 1/4 cup water
1 medium-sized onion, chopped
1 medium-sized well ripened tomato, chopped
1 large clove garlic, chopped
1/3 skin of a scotch bonnet pepper finely chopped (or cachucha pepper)
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
1/8 teaspoon salt (optional)
2 tablespoons olive oil

Serves: 4

DIRECTIONS

Inspect callaloo and remove any debris, old leaves, or hard stalk, etc. Rinse in a large pot of cold water. Discard the water then add enough cold water to cover the callaloo. Dissolve 1/2 teaspoon of salt into the water and let sit for 1/2 to 1 hour. The salt will help to remove any additional small debris from the callaloo. Throw off the water and rinse the callaloo in another pot of cold water. Remove the callaloo and chop in 3/4 inch pieces in a slanted motion.

In a large pot add the 2 tablespoon oil and 1/8 to 1/4 cup water. Put four cups of firmly packed chopped callaloo on top. Add the remaining seasonings on top of the callaloo. Put a lid on the pot. Place on a medium flame and cook for roughly ten minutes or until pieces of the callaloo stalks are tender. The callaloo must stay green. Any discoloration towards brown means the callaloo is being overcooked.

Adapted from eatjamaican.com (defunct – admin)

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