Michael Adler So the forecasting for the last cold front was terrible. Tuesday night's low was dropping all week until it hit 24 that night, but the actual temp didn'tSee More get below 30. Wednesday's forecast was also dropping all week from not near freezing down to 28 that night, and it actually got below 20 degrees (at Siembra). I was not expecting that. Usually for the first cold snap, the freezing of all the tender vegetation protects what's underneath. I didn't mulch our chayotes and I'm not sure they're coming back. Everything froze solid all the way through, if it wasn't cold-hardy or in the greenhouse. Our outdoor thermometer said we got to 25.See Less24.11.2014 at 09:21 pm
Craig Hepworth Yeah, all day on Tuesday I kept thinking it didn't seem like it was going to get as cold as they were predicting, based on current temp and dewpoint. Likewise all day on Wednesday, it never warmed up, and felt like one of those days that's going to turn into a hard freeze overnight. I'm really curious how they can mess up a forecast that badly.24.11.2014 at 09:33 pmRebekah Starr Whipple yeah, I had things covered, but if I had known it was going to be like that, I would have done more.24.11.2014 at 11:53 pmview 1 more commentsFaith Carr Then again with the rain prediction. Is there a weather smartypants? Not smartass.25.11.2014 at 02:23 am
Michael Adler
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24.11.2014 at 10:57 pm
Michael Adler Let's have a chayote festival! We'll get together and bring/cook lots of chayote themed recipes, and eat them and celebrate the abundance. Who's in?See More Who can host? EPP can supply the chayotes.See Less16.11.2014 at 09:37 pm
Karen Epple Can we do it as part of the Earthskills event on 12/7? One issue how the pick-up of the chayotes could be coordinated beforehand? I know the chayotes have a finite shelf life. I hate to see them go to waste. I assume you may give some to the food banks or St Francis House. I understand Woody Blue is coordinating the food for that event.22.11.2014 at 06:05 pmJoni Ellis NO, that day is full of activities and I do not to add more chaos to the activities already planned. There is a food procurement committee that is coordinating all the food donations. Woody is involved, so is Sarah, Gabrieala, PJ, Joe, and several others. There are spreadsheets to keep track of who is donating what. Keep the chayote fest separate please. they don't need processing for the gathering, they will keep just as they are.23.11.2014 at 07:39 am1view 5 more commentsJoni Ellis In addition, EPP is on the schedule for the Dec 7th event to have an open house like education session. I expect people will want to walk around and ask questions about edible plants, and make purchases of plants. I do not want to take away from that. Sorry if I sounded a bit kurt in the message above, I just don't others reorganizing the festival we already put so much time into organizing. I do appreciate the interest in helping. Michael will need help on Dec 7th to talk to folks and make sales. Please do volunteer on that day.23.11.2014 at 07:45 am3Karen Epple Cool, it will be interesting to see what all the creative cooks will prepare with them!23.11.2014 at 02:45 pmKaren Epple Didn't mean to cause a distraction. My enthnthusiasm can get ahead of me, sometimes Looking forward to the whole day!.23.11.2014 at 02:48 pmJoni Ellis Yeah and I didn't mean to squash creativity, I just had a moment of panic with one more thing going on. Keep the ideas coming Karen!24.11.2014 at 10:30 pmMichael Adler We still need to decide on a date. Ellen Cunningham has offered her house as a location.24.11.2014 at 10:55 pm
Joni Ellis I need volunteers to help move the planters in the front of the Co-op ASAP. The city is going to install nice bike racks and benches early December. WhoSee More can help and when? Please call me 352-262-7300 or text me with your ability to help. Thanks a bunch.See Less20.11.2014 at 06:03 pm
Michael Adler Can anyone help move plants into the greenhouse tomorrow afternoon and back out the next day or two? I just thought of lots of things that aren't quiteSee More dormant yet, and might not like a freeze this hard this early.See Less18.11.2014 at 12:18 am
Michael Adler You can take home chayotes and Pigeon peas18.11.2014 at 12:25 amEllen Cunningham Possibly Thursday afternoon. Give me a call if you're still at it.18.11.2014 at 10:18 pmview 3 more commentsMichael Adler thanks Ellen! can you come by after work? I'm not sure when we"ll finish up but maybe 4:30 or 5:30?19.11.2014 at 08:50 pmEllen Cunningham I should be there by 2:30 ish -19.11.2014 at 10:02 pmMichael Adler I probably won't be able to join you that early. Do you mean you'll be available? I'll try to call20.11.2014 at 12:12 am
Michael Adler request for interviewees:

So EPP grows a lot of plants that are popular in various places around the world that are not here. We try to promote useful
See More edible plants that grow well here, and need promotion because many people around here are not familiar with them. Sometimes we meet people from places where our plants are popular, and they're often very happy to become re-acquainted with them. We are looking for such people for interviews for a story on WUFT.

I've been talking with Maleeha with WUFT. She wants to do a story on EPP, and wants to do it from the angle I just described. If this sounds like you, please call or email Maleeha at 850-319-3278 and maleeha.babar@gmail.comSee Less
13.10.2014 at 08:45 pm
Noelle S. Ward I'm in!!!!!13.10.2014 at 09:10 pmMichael Adler cool. Which plants connect you with your cultural traditions?13.10.2014 at 09:26 pmview 8 more commentsNoelle S. Ward Well being a whitebread Florida girl with a heart in the islands, I would say finding sorrel and learning how to grow it and use it and lemongrass for my love of many uses. My cultural traditions probably would not fit into this story but I'm a big fan of EPP!13.10.2014 at 09:40 pm1Lara MacGibbon We appreciate the unique selection EPP offers. My partner, (farm hand at Frog Song) is from Dominica in the Carribean. He has a strong connection to sorrel and caliloo.. plus many others.13.10.2014 at 10:53 pm1Michael Adler Is he interested in contacting the reporter?13.10.2014 at 11:06 pm1Lara MacGibbon Yes, I forwarded her information to him.13.10.2014 at 11:43 pmEdulis Exsto By when? If she wants a good story, it should have notice. This is the first I heard.
Eing and Sam? Maybe also Veronica?14.10.2014 at 01:26 pm
Maleeha Babar Hi Lara - I sent you an email a while ago. I don't think you received it due it going into the 'other' folder. Would you be interested in doing an interview via phone or email tonight?19.11.2014 at 03:40 pm1Maleeha Babar Could you give me a call tonight or whenever you're free?19.11.2014 at 06:34 pmMiranda Castro love to - we'll be available middle of next week if that's not too late19.11.2014 at 06:58 pm

Home


The Edible Plant Project (EPP) is a volunteer-based, 501c3 nonprofit organization working to promote edible landscaping and local food abundance in North Central FL. The goal of the EPP is to create positive alternatives to the unsustainable food system in this country. Gathering Mulberries

2nd Wednesdays, 3-7 pm,  at the Union St. Farmers’ Market booth in Downtown Gainesville. Edible plants, seeds, fruits & more. Most plants are well suited for area and easy to care for.  111 E. University Avenue

Beyond spreading the germplasm of plant varieties, we spread information. Most adoptions come with a comprehensive care sheet.

Subscribe to our Facebook or Yahoo Groups for other opportunities. 

OUR NURSERY
Our nursery is nestled on two organic family farms: Crazy Woman and Siembra. We maintain our nursery for hardy native and exotic vegetables, teas, fruit and nut trees, and our seed bank. We share these with community (either through work trade, barter, or adoption) and welcome your help do so!

Rather than food produced with massive fossil fuel usage in agriculture and transport, with large scale erosion and fertilizer and pesticide run-off, people could be eating food grown locally in yards and landscapes, with little environmental impact or fossil fuel consumption. Rather than food being a packaged, processed commodity, trucked in and purchased at the store, food would once again be something that connects people with nature, with the seasonal cycles of life. Once people realize how easy it is to grow food, there will be many opportunities for giving and sharing the abundance. We invite you to plant fruit trees, and grow and harvest local food to help make Gainesville a beautiful, sustainable place to live.

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES
We offer free workshops and volunteer work trade at our nursery.  Plant propagation (making new plants) & site maintenance.

CONTACT PAGE, CALENDAR links & SOCIAL GROUPS FOR UPDATES
Volunteer or adopt plants in our urban east-side nursery, nestled on a nature preserve and family-run organic farm.  (Sundays* 2-6 pm). New leaders always welcome to help expand hours

OUR SEEDS
We save our locally-adapted, non-hybrid vegetable varieties year to year. Look for our catalog and seed packets at our market booth or at the Citizens Co-Op.  Every year we improve the crop by selecting seed from the plants which do the best. By sharing and distributing seed, we are largely independent from the seed companies and their nationally-marketed hybrid varieties that often require chemical fertilizers and pesticides for good production. No GMOs here! We also partner and share with Grow Gainesville’s Seed Library. See their site for seed saving tips.

36 comments to Home

  • Devadeva Mirel

    Awesome site. I am moving to Alachua in July…leaving behind my lush 2 acres of fruit trees, bushes and edible flowers in Pennsylvania. I have a jam business (local, natural, human made) and am eager to plant stuff on our property but it will be a while till stuff is producing. I am very interested in hooking up with people…especially the kind who have so many figs they don’t know what to do with them.

  • Teresa

    Hey, wow! What a great idea for an organization! I’m in North Florida–Tallahassee–and continue to be amazed by the variety of foods thrive in our amazing climate. Thanks for putting your ideas out here for the rest of us to be inspired by :).

  • Kathy

    I currently live on close to an acre in Jacksonville. I have several different varieties of (4) orange and (3) grapefruit trees along with two pecan trees. I am interested in learning more about your organization.

  • Meg

    What an awesome project! My husband and I are both really into edible plants. We have a small veggie garden and I’ve been foraging around the neighborhood for edible “weeds” and other wild foods to eat/transplant. My current favorites are dandelions and purslane, both of which seem to have transplanted well in the garden. And recently, my husband made a great batch of wild plum jelly (though I like them fresh, too).

    Hopefully someday we’ll realize our dream of filling both the front and back yard with edible plants.

  • Aki

    I’m so glad I discovered your wonderful site! It’s very inspiring, my husband and I have been wanting to replace our lawns (over here in Oakland, CA) with edible plants and your info will be very useful.

    I have a question re. hibiscus: I’m having a hard time figuring out if I have the edible kind. I have several colors, the type you’d see all over Hawaii, and I keep hoping my red one is edible because it produces so many blossoms – I believe the variety is Hibiscus rosa-sinensis ‘Brilliant’. Does anybody have the answer, as well as some hibiscus recipes?

    Thank you!

  • KACEY55

    I believe your project is just what I am looking for. I am disabled and live on a very limited budget. And very limited room. Food or rather nourishing food has become a high commodity for me. So the alternative is planting and growing my own. Onward and upward.

  • justine

    great idea you made it

  • Adam

    Thanks for the great website!Could anyone point me in the right direction for a listing of ;native edible/wild-growing; plants in the North Florida area?Thanks
    Reply
    -www.eattheweeds.com

  • Debbie

    This is a wonderful site and a wonderful idea! I would love to get involved. I am not one of those people who ignores the bounty around us. I am one of the people who get the crazy looks as I stand by the old school yard picking mulberries, or by the edge of the park picking plums, or on the side of the road picking blackberries…and on and on!!! I am planting what I can, but would really love to do more.

  • Carol Mercer

    Fantastic project!!

    Are you assoicated with – or do you know of other similar organizations (in Florida or beyond).
    Many thanks. Carol

  • patrick ahern

    great idea …central florida plants include numerous fruits, including wild bananna’s(plantains?)-small avacdo trees, besides the numerous citruses that go unpicked for lack of interest — all could be put to better use
    thanks
    pat

  • David

    Anyone know which plants I can eat here in Florida?

  • purewolf386

    I live in Lorain, OH, and I have close to 50 LBS. of rabbit manure, which makes awesome natural fertilizer. I desperately need to get rid of this resorce soon. Anyone interested in it please email me or reply to my post!
    The weeds are huge when they get into this stuff!! So if your looking for county fair sizes for produce then give me a hollar!

  • nick

    Greetings everyone! I stumbled upon this site (literally!) and I have a friend who is starting a non profit called the tallahassee nucleus, which is a urban farming project. The site has a lemon tree, two orange/pecan/ fig/ banana/ lots more!! Any one from the epp wanna have a JAM Ba RII?!! We welcome all types of people into our space and designate slots for workshops to be filled soo email me and lets cross pollunate! We do a seed exchange/ drum circle every thursday and all types of farming so come check us out if your in tallahassee, email me and I will set you up! Peace!
    Whitespectralwind@tmail.com

  • papajamaican

    Hi all, came across some glucose and I’m wondering of doping up a nutrient/ fertilizer brew for vegtables and plants, any pros and cons to this mad scientist endeavour?

  • ChayaMan

    papajamaican – I have no direct experience with adding glucose to fertilizer, but…

    when I plant cuttings, I dip them into HONEY instead of rooting compounds. They sprout faster, and I think it’s partly because of bio-available sugars. So I think using glucose might help things out.

    Also, I think I remember that sugars have anti-bacterial properties.

    The only downside I can think of is digging from sweet-hungry predators like rats and raccoons. Happens every time I plant sugar cane! :(

  • ChayaMan

    Whoops! Sorry – posted in wrong place – . What I *meant* to say is –

    EPP ROCKS!!! :) And I wish I lived near enough to Gainesville to attend your plant sale!

    Favorite places: Trees For Life, TopTropicals, ECHO, and now EPP! Keep up the good work!

  • Tim

    Thanks for the plants today. I can’t wait to watch them grow!

  • Rob

    Great to see people in FL doing great work! Are you still doing plant sales at the downtown farmers markets?

    Rob
    http://wcpermaculture.org

  • Kim

    I’m so glad I found this site. I’ve been looking at other sites all over the US but so glad your in my back yard. I’m in the High Springs/Bell area.

  • Kim

    I’m looking for heirloom seeds. What types do you sell at the plant sells?

  • Peg

    This is so awesome! We are doing the same thing here in Polk county, a little south of you. Lakeland is the main city and is half way between Orlando and Tampa. Our group the Barefoot Gardeners, have a website:
    http://www.thebarefootgardener.org and a yahoo group to learn from each other. We also have a Facebook Page: Barefoot Gardeners Organic Central Florida. We are inspired to get many Food Forests going, and several of us have small organic farms that feed us and others, sharing our extra bounty at the weekly Downtown Lakeland Farmers Curb Market. We have field trips and classes at the Farm strongly encouraging others to grow it themselves.

  • ver

    i have some weed in my backyard wanna start eating some of them but i don’t seems to find out what they are. I live in orange park florida. near jacksonville. anyone know any edible weed reference sites?

  • EPP Michael

    Chia – I didn’t receive any emails, I’m not sure who you tried. I don’t check these posts often. None of the figs growing at our nursery have died from disease, so I find it very hard to believe that’s what happened to yours. Did you keep them well watered? That is the most common problem people experience. Potted plants usually need to be watered every day, sometimes twice, depending on how much foliage the plant has, in relation to the pot size. It is especially important when the weather is warm. Once the soil in a pot has dried, watering once will not re-wet the soil. You usually need to water many times or submerge the pot in water to override the hydrophobic reaction of soil organic matter.

  • George

    Does anyone have experience growing mangos from seed in Gainesville?

    Tung trees?

    Transplanting Catalpas?

  • Brian

    It’s that time, blueberry & grapes are here or here soon.

    Here is a list of area u-picks.
    http://www.pickyourown.org/FLnorth.htm

  • Michael

    I have recently purchased an acre and a half, and the goal is to cover with all kind of fruit and nut trees. My question is this: I have a huge orange tree that is supposedly sour. Is there any way to make it not sour? I hate to waste thousands of oranges. I heard putting lime around the base, is this correct? Any help?

  • Sour oranges were a common rootstock. A hard freeze would sometimes kill the grafted portion of the tree, and the regrowth would come from the rootstock, which would bear sour oranges. You cannot make them turn sweet. You can, however use them like lemons or limes to make delicious pies and orange-ade.

  • I live in Panama City, Fl and would like to plant an edable hedge. At first I planed to plant Elderberries and currants but believe they will not like the full day sun and sandy soil. Blackberries might work but will take a longe time to grow and allow a lot of undergrowth. Any helpful advice would be appreciated.
    Diann

  • I’ve never heard of anyone growing currants in FL. Elderberries will make a very large and thick hedge. They will also sucker out the sides. They like sun, but also like damp soil. Blackberries will likely need trellising, and will be the opposite of elderberries. There won’t be much of a hedge there.

    Other options include blueberries, feijoa (pineapple guava), and pomegranate. You could also built a trellis for a variety of vines, like maypop, muscadine grape, luffa, chayote, etc. A trellised bean rotation between snow peas and speckled lima beans might be nice too. The snow peas will be far smaller than the limas, which can be very aggressive. I think I’ve heard of some other things called scarlett runners, and wing beans, and hyacinth beans which may be vines, but I don’t know much about them. Also, a variety of yams will grow vines up a trellis. You may be able to find wild Dioscorea alata, the less common of the two types of air potato, near your local creeks. They’re labeled as noxious weeds and illegal to sell, but they are quite controlable as long as you don’t plant them on a forest edge or near a creek. They’re also quite good to eat.

  • Charles Brown

    To answer the question from Aki,<!–mep-nl–>yes, a flower from Hibiscus rosa-sinensis is edible.<!–mep-nl–>See:<!–mep-nl–>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hibiscus_rosa-sinensis&lt;!–mep-nl–><!–mep-nl–>Also at the bottom there is a reference to<!–mep-nl–>Hibiscus tea.

  • Charles Brown

    EDIBLE FLOWERS

    One item I have not seen mentioned on Edible Plant Project is Edible Flowers. For more info see: http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/hil/hil-8513.html
    or http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/garden/07237.html

  • good point charles! the moringa’s flowers are edible – really delicious

  • Jeanne Ridings Delacruz

    Aloha from Hawaii. What a great site. Although you are in Florida, my interest in edible weeds is becoming a way of eating fresh organic veggies from the wild. In Hawaii we do have the spinach tree. Thanks for this site, I try to get to know a lot of edible weeds. Hawaiian healing is all plants. There is also a lot of things here that no one knows of to eat. I am teaching what I know to my children and friends. They kind of snicker. But here's what I do, I cook some of these edible weeds and put some in salads. When they get through eating and telling how tasty my food was, I tell them exactly what they ate. They are surprised. I also do this because of the way the world is now. I can almost barely go to the store for veggies and fruits. Here we share food and fruits, so I do okay. You have a lot of information here. Again mahalo-thanks for this wonderful site. Jeanne ridings delacruz,grannie,70 years old and still going strong.

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